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Recent Scott-Related Events

This page lists recent conferences, papers, lectures, talks, and other events relating to all aspects of Scott's life and work. The page editor would be glad to be informed of any omissions or errors, or to receive notification of other relevant events.

Click here for a list of forthcoming Scott-related events:

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

2014

1) 'Cataloguing the Abbotsford Library', Talk by Lindsay Levy, Carlyle Society, University of Edinburgh, 16 February 2014

Lindsay Levy gave a talk to the Carlyle Society on the work of the Abbotsford Library Research Project, which has completed a catalogue of Scott's personal library at Abbotsford House.

2) ‘The Grammar of the Imagination: A Symposium in Memory of Professor Susan Manning’, University of Edinburgh, 21-22 February 2014

The English Department of Edinburgh University hosted a symposium in memory of their late colleague Susan Manning, Grierson Professor of English and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, who died in January 2013. The weekend consisted of a round-table discussion of Professor Manning's last book, The Poetics of Character, a public lecture, ‘Toward a Compositionist Poetics: Through Ballads to the Mesh’ by Professor Maureen McLane (New York), and a day conference on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literary connections with distinguished international speakers including James Chandler (Chicago), Claire Connolly (Cork), Ian Duncan (Berkeley), Heather Glen (Cambridge), Catherine Jones (Aberdeen), and Nigel Leask (Glasgow). Prof. McLane is the author of Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Romanticism and the Human Sciences (CUP, 2000, 2006).

3) 'Abbotsford', Edinburgh Philosophical Institution Lecture by Matthew Withey, Saltire Society Edinburgh Branch, Royal OverSeas League, Edinburgh, 19 March 2014

In the 2014 Edinburgh Philosophical Institution Lecture, Matthew Withey, Curator at Abbotsford, talked about the history, and future, of Sir Walter Scott's home in the Scottish Borders.

4) 'Waverley at 200', One-Day Symposium, University of Dundee, 22 March 2014

The Centre for Scottish Culture at the University of Dundee presented a symposium in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the publication of Walter Scott’s debut novel, Waverley. Speakers includde: David Finkelstein (Dundee), Jodi-Anne George (Dundee), Eleanor Harris (Stirling), Alison Lumsden (Aberdeen), Murdo Macdonald (Dundee), Tom Mole (Edinburgh), Graeme Morton (Dundee), Murray Pittock (Glasgow), David Robb (Dundee), Jim Stewart (Dundee), and Chris Whatley (University of Dundee). The day conclued with a performance of Scott's drama Macduff's Cross by the JOOT Theatre Company.

5) 'The Supernatural in Literature and Film: Ghosts, Fairies, Aliens, Vampires, Monsters, and Demons', Three-Day Conference, Lerwick, Shetland, 29-31 March 2014

Organized by Island Dynamics, this conference brought together researchers and practitioners to discuss the role of the supernatural in literature and film, past and present, worldwide. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Wizard of the North: The Supernatural in Walter Scott's Novels' by Anna Fancett (Aberdeen).

6) 'Emblems and Enigma: The Heraldic Imagination'. Interdisciplinary Symposium, Society of Antiquaries of London, 26 April 2014

Hosted by the Society of Antiquaries of London, ths symposium invited paperson any aspect of the employment and perception of the heraldic in literature, history, art, architecture, design, fashion, and contemporary and historical practice. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Symbolising Succession: Walter Scott’s and Charlotte Yonge’s Use of Heraldry’ by Diana Powell (University of Liverpool).

7) 'Transcending Oppositions in Scottish Culture', Two-Day Symposium, University of Porto, Portugal, 2-3 June 2014

This symposium, organised by the Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies (CETAPS) of the University of Porto, addressed the problem of oppositions in all aspects of Scottish culture across the centuries. At the same time, it commemorated the 200th anniversary of the publication of Sir Walter Scott’s début novel, Waverley, a landmark in the history of the representations of Scotland and of the symbolic negotiations which involve past and present, realism and romance, politics and personal identity, Englishness and Scottishness. It featured the following papers of particular Scott interest: Maeve Adams (Manhattan College), '"The Force of my Narrative": Persuasion, Nation and Paratext in Walter Scott’s Waverley Novels', Miguel Alarcão (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), 'There was a Writer, a Scottish Writer: Transcending Oppositions in Scott’s Ivanhoe (1819)', Eugenio-Enrique Cortés-Ramírez (Castilla-La Mancha), 'Waverley’s Successful Concordia: The Overcome of Jacobin Disputes in the Early 19th Century', Luísa Leal de Faria (Universidade Católica Portuguesa), 'The Oak Whose Acorns Have Sown a Forest: Thomas Carlyle on John Knox, Robert Burns, Walter Scott and How the Past May Inspire the Future', Carmen Gonçalves (Colégio da Rainha Santa Isabel), 'Identity Games: A Hidden Agenda in Selected Paratexts of Walter Scott', Aniela Korzeniowska (Warsaw), 'Sir Walter Scott and Hugh MacDiarmid: Two Exceptional Literary Figures and their Views in Reference to the Union with England', and Jorge Bastos da Silva (Porto), 'The Veiled Subject in Walter Scott'.

8) First World Congress of Scottish Literatures, University of Glasgow, 2-5 July 2014

The University of Glasgow hosted the first World Congress of Scottish Literatures in the College of Arts, with the involvement of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies and other bodies. There were many significant contributions on Scott. Ann Rigney (Utrecht) delivered a plenary lecture 'How Scott Met the Mahatma: Reflections on World Literature'. Ian Duncan (Berkeley) chaired 'Rethinking the Historical Novel: A Roundtable on Scott and ‘the classical form of the historical novel’ 200 Years After Waverley', which featured panellists Ina Ferris (Ottawa), Margaret Kolb (Berkeley), and Matthew Ocheltree (Harvard). Ainsley MacIntosh (Aberdeen) discussed the forthcoming Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott's Poetry during a roundtable on 'Editing Scottish Texts in the Twenty-First Century'. The congress also featured the following individual papers of particular Scott interest: Kang-yen Chiu (Sun Yat-sen), 'The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in China', Susanne Hagemann (Mainz/Germersheim), 'Scott’s First German Translators', Lindsay Levy (Glasgow), 'The Patriotism of Bibliography: Walter Scott and the Book Clubs', K. P. Müller (Mainz), 'History in Scottish Novels from John Galt to James Robertson and their Theoretical Backgrounds', Susan Oliver (Essex), 'The Matter of Landscape: Walter Scott and the Ecology of a Changing Nation', Josef Olson (Otago), 'Reading and Writing Scott in the South Pacific', Juliet Shields (Washington), 'At Sea in The Pirate', and Matthew Wickman (Brigham Young), 'Redgauntlet: Speculation in History, Speculation in Nature'.

9) 'Activating the Archive', Tenth International Scott Conference, University of Aberdeen, 8-12 July 2014

The University of Aberdeen is home to the Bernard C. Lloyd Collection of Walter Scott Materials, one of the largest collections of material relating to Scott anywhere in the world. Recently moved to a new home in the Special Collections Centre in the award winning Sir Duncan Rice Library, the Lloyd Collection is particularly rich in materials that demonstrate the international and cultural legacies of Scott’s work. With the broad theme of Activating the Archive, the Tenth International Scott Conference explored the ways in which archives related to Scott may be exploited for scholarship and how they can enhance our understanding of his work. It also celebrated the bi-centenary of the publication of Waverley in a library which holds fine Jacobite collections.

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2013

1) 'Credit, Money and the Market': 42nd Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, St Hugh's College, Oxford, 3-5 January 2013

The Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, held at St Hugh's College, University of Oxford, addressed eighteenth-century understandings of Credit, Money and the Market, and their workings and effects, broadly conceived, throughout the long eighteenth century, at all levels of society, and in any part of the world. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"Turning Lead to Gold": Walter Scott's Works of Swift' by Daniel Cook (Cambridge).

2) 'Avenues of Access', 128th MLA Annual Convention, Boston, Massachusettes, 3-6 January 2013

The 128th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association (MLA) featured four papers of Scott interest: 'Poetry in the Unnecessarily Restricted Sense in Scott’s Waverley' by Nicholas Bujak (Johns Hopkins), 'Robin Hood Onstage in Dramatic Versions of Scott's Ivanhoe' by Jeff Dailey (Five Towns College), 'Importing Trees and Exporting People: Walter Scott's Transatlantic Ecology' by Susan Oliver (Essex), and 'Euromance of Reunion: Sir Walter Scott, Italy, and Tourism in Postbellum America' by Kaye Wierzbicki (Harvard).

3) 'Rokeby: Poetry and Landscape; Walter Scott and Turner in Teesdale', The Bowes Museum, Castle Barnard, County Durham, 26 January-28 April 2013

This exhibition marked the bicentenary of the publication of Rokeby, which Scott wrote following several visits to John Morritt’s country estate, Rokeby Park, having taken inspiration from the surrounding scenery. The Bowes Museum is situated a mile from the estate, at the centre of the landscape brought to life in the poem. Rokeby placed Teesdale firmly on the tourist map as well as drawing a succession of artists to the region, including Turner, who produced twenty views for Whitaker’s An History of Richmondshire, four of which relate to locations in the poem. Scott’s publisher Cadell later commissioned Turner to illustrate a complete edition of the poet’s works, stating that he could sell 8,000 copies with Turner’s illustrations as opposed to 3,000 without. Exploring the relationship between literature and art, the exhibition (curated by the Museum’s Keeper of Fine Art, Emma House) examined the poem’s role in attracting artists such as Turner, Atkinson Grimshaw, and the Pre-Raphaelite Alfred William Hunt to the region, highlighting the importance of Teesdale in the development of landscape painting in Britain. It included loans from the British Museum, Tate, and regional galleries as well as paintings from the Museum’s own collection. The exhibition was accompanied by a catalogue and a full programme of events, featuring walking tours, workshops, and talks including a guest lecture on Scott's poem by Prof. Fiona Robertson.

4) 'Reiving and Bereaving: Walter Scott and the Rich Ballad Tradition of the Scottish Borders', Songs and Tales by Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 7 February 2013

Lucy Macrae and Kaye McAlpine of the School of Celtic and Scottish Studies presented an introduction to Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border and the historical background of the Borders, featuring ballads sungs by traditional singers Naomi Harvey, Kathy Hobkirk, Elsa LeMaitre and Henry Douglas. Lucy MacRae is working on a Ph.D. that looks at collective memory in the Scottish Borders around 1800, with particular focus on the cultural context of the Minstrelsy texts. Dr McAlpine is Research Fellow on the AHRC/DFG Walter Scott Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border Project. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

5) ‘Transporting the Romantic: Sir Walter Scott, Washington Irving and the Romantic Writer’s House’, Talk by Prof. Nicola Watson, Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research, Cardiff University, 26 February 2013

In this talk, hosted by Cardiff University's Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR), visiting speaker Prof. Nicola Watson investigated the making of Washington Irving’s house in New York State, Sunnyside, as a reworking of Sir Walter Scott’s exercise in self-presentation at Abbotsford. Prof. Watson is Professor of English Literature at the Open University. She edited The Antiquary (1999) for Oxford World Classics and is author of Revolution and the Form of the English Novel, 1790-1825 (Oxford University Press, 1994) and The Literary Tourist: Readers and Places in Romantic and Victorian Britain (Palgrave, 2006).

6) 'Bringing Walter Scott into the 21st Century', Debate with Prof. David Purdie and Prof. Alan Riach, Edinburgh Central Library, 28 February 2013

In 2012, Prof. David Purdie (Chairman of the Edinburgh Walter Scott Club) published a controversial abridgment of Sir Scott's Ivanhoe and is currently working on an abridgment of The Heart of Mid-Lothian. Prof. Purdie joined Prof. Alan Riach (Glasgow) for a lively debate on the merits and ethics of bringing Scott into the 21st century, as well as a general discussion on Scott's heroes, heroines, tales and tropes. The event was hosted by Edinburgh Central Library and chaired by Stuart Kelly, author of Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation, and Literary Editor of Scotland on Sunday.

7) 'Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field', Rehearsed Reading, Parliament Hall, St. Andrews, 10 March 2013

In the 500th anniversary year of the Battle of Flodden, as part of the Stanza Poetry Festival, a distinguished cast, including Crawford Logan, John Nichol, Judy Steel, and Gerda Stevenson, performed a special rehearsed reading of Scott's Marmion in Parliament Hall, St. Andrews University.

8) 44th Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), Boston, Massachusetts, 21-24 March 2013

The Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) featured one panel of particular Scott interest: Under Scott’s Shadow: Historical Fiction in the Nineteenth Century. This featured the following papers: 'Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the "Accurate" Historical Novel' by Kristen Fisher (Pennsylvania State), 'The Novelist and the Historian: The Case of Bulwer-Lytton' by Lesley Goodman (Harvard), and 'Affect-ations of History in Bulwer-Lytton’s The Last Days of Pompeii' by Louetta Hurst (Rutgers).

9) 'Rokeby's Lines: Walter Scott, Poetry, and Possession', Guest Lecture by Prof. Fiona Robertson, The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham, 3 April 2013

To mark the exhibition 'Rokeby: Poetry and Landscape; Walter Scott and Turner in Teesdale' (The Bowes Museum, 26 January-28 April 2013), Prof. Fiona Robertson gave a lecture on Scott's Rokeby and the literary and artistic traditions surrounding it. Prof. Robertson is Horace Walpole Professor of English Literature at St Mary's University College. She is author of Legitimate Histories: Scott, Gothic, and the Authorities of Fiction (Oxford, 1994) and editor of The Bride of Lammermoor (Oxford World Classics, 1991) and The Edinburgh Companion to Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh, 2012).

10) 44th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Cleveland, Ohio, 4-7 April 2013

The 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Convicta et Combusta: Walter Scott’s Condemned Woman, the Chivalric Tradition, and
Common Law Legitimacy' by Erin Sheley (George Washington) and 'Walter Scott’s Works of Swift: "Turning Lead to Gold"' by Daniel Cook (Dundee).

11) 'The Man Who Made Scotland', Radio Talk by James Naughtie, BBC Radio 4, 10 April 2013, and BBC Radio Scotland, 6 May 2013

To celebrate the return of Rossini's La Donna del Lago (adapted from Scott's The Bride of Lammermoor) to the Royal Opera House for the first time in almost 30 years, James Naughtie argued that Scott is more relevant now than ever to how Scotland tells the story of itself and to how it addresses the increasingly pressing question of what it means to be Scottish. The common view is that Scott rewrote the story of a small nation and left a trail of sentimentality and naval-gazing in his wake, but, argued Naughtie, Scott's branding of Scotland is the mark of a thoroughly modern thinker and it's been a lot more useful to Scotland than we might think. While the nation has occasionally struggled to escape his 'Balmorality', Naughtie believes that Scott reminds everyone, in countries a long way from Scotland, how important the idea of a national story can become.

12) 'Scott and Malta: A Mediterranean Adventure', Talk by Lt Cdr Dairmid Gunn OBE, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 11 April 2013

Lt Commander Dairmid Gunn is well-known to members of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club as one of its most established Council members. He has previously given talks on many Scott-related topics, including Scott's impact on Cardinal Newman and John Buchan. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

13) 'Crosscurrents 2013', Postgraduate Conference in Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, 12-14 April 2013

The 2013 Crosscurrents conference, hosted by the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, featured three papers of particular Scott interest: '"The Peculiar Charm of Locality": Locating Cultural Memory in Walter Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border' by Lucy MacRae (Edinburgh), 'Cultural Memory and Closure in the Ending of Walter Scott’s Waverley' by Lisa McKenna (Aberdeen), and 'The Anxiety of Textual Creation: An Exploration of the Link between Maternity and Writing in Walter Scott’s The Monastery' by Anna Fancett (Aberdeen).

14) Summerhall Historical Fiction Festival, Summerhall, Edinburgh, 12-15 April 2013

Summerhall, Edinburgh’s award-winning Arts Centre, launched Britain’s largest Historical Fiction Festival with a line up of acclaimed authors and sessions dealing with both contemporary and classic texts. The Festival featured two events of particular Scott interest. It opens with the launch of the complete Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, which will be presented by chief editors David Hewitt and Alison Lumsden (both Aberdeen). There followed a talk by Christopher Harvie on 'Walter Scott and Napoleon'.

15) Spring Meeting of the Traditional Song Forum, Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh, 20 April 2013

The Spring Meeting of the Traditional Song Forum, co-organized by the School of Celtic and Scottish Studies, University of Edinburgh, featured one event of particular Scott interest. In 'Reiving and Bereaving', Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine presented a journey deep into the 'Debatable Lands' of the Scottish Borders, a region laden with history and myth from which Scott drew both material and inspiration for the ballad collection Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802. They will be joined by acclaimed traditional singers Kathy Hobkirk and Henry Douglas to bring the ballads and their history to life. Lucy MacRae is working on a Ph.D. that looks at collective memory in the Scottish Borders around 1800, with particular focus on the cultural context of the Minstrelsy texts. Dr McAlpine is Research Fellow on the AHRC/DFG Walter Scott Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border Project.

16) 'Pentland Crossings', Talks and Readings about Orkney Literature, University of Edinburgh, 4 May 2013

Hosted by Scottish Writing in the Nineteenth Century (SWINC), this conference launched the Writing the North project, a partnership between Shetland Museum and Archives and the University of Edinburgh. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"A little world by itself': Walter Scott's Orkney and Shetland', an analysis of Scott's The Pirate by Alison Lumsden (Aberdeen). Prof. Lumsden is a General Editor of the recently completed Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels and Co-Director of the University of Aberdeen's Walter Scott Research Centre. For the Edinburgh Edition, she has edited Peveril of the Peak (2007) and co-edited The Pirate (2001), The Heart of Mid-Lothian (2004), and Reliquiae Trotcosienses (2004). Her monograph Walter Scott and the Limits of Language was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2010. She has recently begun work on a scholarly edition of Scott's poetry.

17) 'Reiving and bereaving: Celebrating Sir Walter Scott and the Rich Ballad Traditions of the Scottish Borders', Workshop by Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine, Fife Traditional Singing Festival, Fife Animal Park, 12 May 2013

Fresh from their success at last year's Innerleithen Music Festival, folklore scholars Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine from the School of Celtic and Scottish Studies, Edinburgh presented a workshop journeying deep into the Debatable Lands of the Scottish Borders, a region steeped in myth and history from which Scott drew both material and inspiration for his ballad collection Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. The event explored the historical and cultural background of both the area itself and Scott's creation of the Minstrelsy, while the ballads themselves were brought to life by traditional singers Henry Douglas, Naomi Harvey, Kathy Hobkirk, and Elsa Lemaitre. Lucy MacRae is working on a Ph.D. that looks at collective memory in the Scottish Borders around 1800, with particular focus on the cultural context of the Minstrelsy texts. Dr McAlpine is Research Fellow on the AHRC/DFG Walter Scott Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border Project.

18) 'Scott in 2013: New Scholarship and Old Connections', Talk by Prof. Fiona Robertson, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 16 May 2013

Prof. Robertson is Horace Walpole Professor of English Literature at St Mary's University College. She is author of Legitimate Histories: Scott, Gothic, and the Authorities of Fiction (Oxford, 1994) and editor of The Bride of Lammermoor (Oxford World Classics, 1991) and The Edinburgh Companion to Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh, 2012). Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

19) 'On the Edge: Transitions, Transgressions, and Transformations in Irish and Scottish Studies', International Interdisciplinary Conference, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, 19-23 June 2013

Co-presented by the Canadian Association for Irish Studies/L'Association canadienne d'études irlandaises and the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, and hosted by Simon Fraser University, this event featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Romancing the Past in Nineteenth-Century Scottish and Irish Literature: Walter Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border' by Lucy MacRae (Edinburgh) and 'Gothic Histories: Banim, Scott, and Romancing the Past in the 1820s' by Jim Kelly (Exeter).

20) International Conference on Narrative 2013, Manchester Metropolitan University, 27-29 June 2013

The 2013 International Conference on Narrative, sponsored by the International Society for the Study of Narrative, and hosted by Manchester Metropolitan University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott and Desultory Quotation' by Matthew Fellion (St. Francis Xavier).

21) 'Global Romanticism', 2nd Biennial Conference of the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia, University of Sydney, Australia, 3-5 July 2013

Hosted by the University of Sydney, the 2nd Biennial Conference of the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA) featured four papers of particular Scott interest: Penny Fielding (Edinburgh), 'Scott’s The Pirate and Romantic Geography: The Island, the Archipelago, and the World', Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming), 'Site or Sight?: The Romantic Circulation of Walter Scott', Graham Tulloch (Flinders), 'Scott, India and Australia: Personal and Literary Connections', and Brian Wall (Edinburgh), 'Legality and Justice in Scott and Hawthorne'.

22) 'The Locations of Austen', International Interdisciplinary Conference, University of Hertfordshire, UK, 11-13 July 2013

Held at the University of Hertfordshire, this conference celebrated the bicentenary of the publication of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (which is set in Hertfordshire). It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'In the Name of the Mother: A Comparative Discussion of the Relationship between Maternity and the Creation of Narrative in the Novels of Jane Austen and Walter Scott' by Anna Fancett (Aberdeen).

23) 'Sir Walter Scott Home Again': Reading by Alasdair Hutton, Peebles Library, Peebles, Scottish Borders, 18 July 2013

To mark the reopening of Abbotsford House, Alasdair Hutton, Chairman of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, read a selection of Scott's best-loved poems. Contact Peebles Library for further details.

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2012

1) 'Landscapes & Environments', 41st Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, St Hugh's Colleges, Oxford, 4-6 January 2012

The 41st Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (BSECS), hosted by St Hugh's College, University of Oxford, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Border Crossings and Initiation Rituals in Walter Scott’s Waverley and Guy Mannering' by Céline Sabiron (Sorbonne-Paris IV).

2) 'Language, Literature, Learning', 127th MLA Annual Convention, Seattle, 5-8 January 2012

The 127th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association (MLA) featured two papers of Scott interest: 'Lyric Mindedness and the "Automaton Poet" in Coleridge and Scott' by John Savarese (Rutgers University) and 'Revolting Gaelic: Rebellious Scottish Codes in Scott and Stevenson' by Anna Faktorovich (Edinboro University of Pennsylvania).

3) 'Scott and the Pharos: The Lighthouse Tour of 1814 Revisited', Talk by Prof. David Purdie, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 2 February 2012

Professor David Purdie, Chairman of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club gave a talk on Scott's participation in a voyage of inspection by the Commissioners for the Northern Lighthouse Service in Summer 1814, on returning from which he found his anonymous novel Waverley a runaway success and his future in an alternative genre assured. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

4) 'Shared Visions: Art, Theatre and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century', One-Day Conference, University of Warwick, 11 February 2012

This conference, co-hosted by the School of Theatre, Performance, and Cultural Policy Studies, University of Warwick, and the journal Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film, explored the connections between art, theatre, and visual culture in the nineteenth century. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: '" ...taken from the original": Word, Image and the Drive for Authenticity in Early Stagings of the Works of Sir Walter Scott' by Barbara Bell (Edinburgh Napier University).

5) 'Walter Scott and the Bad Boys: Scott, Burns and Byron', Lecture by Lindsay Levy, Broughton History Society, Drummond Community High School, Edinburgh, 12 March 2012

Lindsay Levy (Advocates' Library) is cataloguing Scott's library at Abbotsford House as part of the Abbotsford Library Research Project. More information from Broughton History Society.

6) 2012 International Conference on Narrative, Las Vegas, Nevada, 15-17 March 2012

The 2012 International Conference on Narrative, sponsored by the International Society for the Study of Narrative, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Poetry of Walter Scott and the Development of the Novel' by Nick Bujak (Johns Hopkins).

7) NeMLA 2012 Convention, Rochester, NY, 15-18 March 2012

The 43rd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association, hosted by St. John Fisher College, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'An Occluded Other: The Vanishing Dispossessed in Sir Walter Scott’s Three Jacobite Novels' by Bob Thomson (Deakin University) and 'Saladin and Tipu: The Depiction of Muslim Orientals in Sir Walter Scott’s Novels' by Suha Kudsieh (College of Staten Island-CUNY).

8) 'Scotland and the Indian Subcontinent', Economic & Social History Society of Scotland Spring Conference, Glasgow, 21 March 2012

The 2012 Spring Conference of the Economic & Social History Society of Scotland featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Hospitality, Orientalism and Empire in Walter Scott’s "The Surgeon’s Daughter"', by Kang-yen Chiu (Glasgow).

9) 43rd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, San Antonio, Texas, 22-24 March 2012

The 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Eighteenth-Century Scottish Literature: From the Act of Union to Scott’s Waverley' by Elizabeth Kraft (Georgia).

10) 'CEA 2012: Borders', 43rd Annual Conference of the College English Association, Richmond, VA, 29-31 March 2012

The 2012 Annual Meeting of the College English Association featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Blurring Borders of Genre and Identity: (Generic) Otherness in Scott's Guy Mannering' by Jamie Gibbs (South Carolina) and 'Scott Borders' by Karen Lentz Madison (Arkansas).

11) 'Abbotsford: An Exciting Future', Talk by Sandra McNeil, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 5 April 2012

Sandra McNeil, Learning and Engagement Officer at Abbotsford House, will discuss future developments at Scott's home in the Scottish Borders, which include the scheduled opening of a Visitor Centre in Summer 2012 and the re-opening of the House, following an extensive programme of repair and refurbishment in 2013. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

12) 'Voices, Manuscripts and "Guid Black Prent"', 2012 Meeting of the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 12-15 April 2012

The 25th Annual Conference of the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, co-hosted by University of South Carolina Libraries and the Department of English, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Operatic Remediations of The Bride of Lammermoor: Donizetti’s Lucia in Comparative National Context' by Catherine Jones (Aberdeen) and 'The Presbyterian Interpretation of History and the Debate over Old Mortality in Scotland and Nova Scotia' by Valerie Wallace (Harvard).

13) 'Novel Worlds', 1st Biennial Conference of the Society for Novel Studies, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27-28 April 2012

The inaugural Biennial Conference of the Society for Novel Studies, sponsored by the journal NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction, and hosted by Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Living American History after Waverley' by Mike Goode (Syracuse).

14) 'Romanticism and Secrets', One-Day Conference, Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol, 2 May 2012

This one-day conference, organized by the Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Walter Scott’s Secret Authorship, Or a Reversed Masquerade Played Across the Channel’ by Céline Sabiron (Oxford).

15) 'Sir Walter Scott and James Hogg: A City and Country Friendship', Talk by Dr Gillian Hughes, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 3 May 2012

Dr Gillian Hughes, author of James Hogg: A Life (2007), main editor of The Collected Letters of James Hogg (2004-08), and one of the general editors of the Stirling/South Carolina Research Edition of the Collected Works of James Hogg, examinde parallels between the dual metropolitan and country lifestyles of Scott and Hogg. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

16) 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 10-13, 2012

The 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies, sponsored by the Medieval Institute of Western Michigan University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'From Ivanhoe to Ironclad: Changing Representations of Templars in Fiction and Film' by Teresa Rupp (Mount St. Mary’s University).

17) 'Crime Scotland: Then and Now', 2nd Conference of the Society for Scottish Studies in Europe, 31 May-3 June 2012, Georg-August University, Goettingen, Germany

The 2nd Conference of the Society for Scottish Studies in Europe, hosted by the English Department of Georg-August University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott's Walking Stick: The Case of Major Weir' by Silvia Mergenthal (Konstanz).

18) 'Romantic Connections: Networks of Influence, c.1760-1835', BARS Early Career and Postgraduate Conference, Newcastle University, 1 June 2012

Organized by the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS), and hosted by Newcastle University, this conference featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Paratext and Intertext in the 'Introductory Epistle' to Walter Scott's The Fortunes of Nigel' by Alys Mostyn (Leeds).

19) 'Crossing the Highland Line in the 19th Century: Cross-Currents in Scottish Writing', ASLS Annual Conference 2012, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Isle of Skye, 8-10 June 2012

The nineteenth century saw the romanticisation of the Highlander, the rise of tartanry, and the emergence of the modern Scottish tourist industry. It also witnessed the worst excesses of the Clearances and the beginnings of an exodus from the Highlands to the industrial cities and to the colonies. The Annual Conference of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies, hosted by Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, examined the literary culture of Scotland – Highland and Lowland – during this transformational period, and will explore its interactions and intersections. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'What Can Walter Scott Offer Us Today?' by poet and novelist Christopher Whyte.

20) 'Besoms, Keelies, and Merry Men: Scott’s Contributions to Jamieson’s Dictionary', Talk by Dr Susan Rennie, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 14 June 2012

Dr Susan Rennie is author of Jamieson's Dictionary of Scots: The Story of the First Historical Dictionary of the Scots Language (Oxford University Press, 2012). A former Senior Editor with Scottish Language Dictionaries, she edited the online Dictionary of the Scots Language (2001-04). She has also written several Scots-language books for children, including the award-winning Animal ABC: A Scots Alphabet (2002). Her talk focused on fresh discoveries concerning Scott’s participation in John Jamieson’s Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language (1808). Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club. (See Rennie 2012 for Scott's contributions to the 1825 Supplement to Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary.)

21) 'Taking Liberties: Sex, Pleasure, Coercion (1748-1928)', Two-Day Conference, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 15-16 June 2012

Organised at Newcastle University by the Long Nineteenth Century Research Group (School of English), with the support of the Gender Research Group and the Newcastle Institute for the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, this international multidisciplinary conference featured two papers of Scott interest: 'Playthings and Puritans: Sex, Pleasure and Coercion in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Walter Scott’s Kenilworth' by Harriet Briggs (Newcastle) and '"Pray, Sir, is not the Ravishing going to begin?": Representations of Sexual Coercion in the Novels of Walter Scott’ by Melinda Graefe (Flinders).

22) 'Moving Forward 2012: The Use, Misuse and Abuse of Identity', Annual Postgraduate Conference, University of Aberdeen, 22-25 June 2012

'Moving Forward 2012', the ninth in a series of annual interdisciplinary postgraduate conferences, hosted by the College of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Aberdeen, featured on paper of particular Scott interest: 'Shadows of the Past and Future: the Identity of the Parental Body in the Novels of Walter Scott and Jane Austen' by Anna Fancett (Aberdeen).

23) 'James Hogg and the Romantics', 2012 James Hogg Conference, University of Glasgow, 29-30 June 2012

The Biennial James Hogg Conference was jointly hosted by the James Hogg Society and the School of Critical Studies at the University of Glasgow. Papers explored the nature of Hogg’s relationship with other Romantic writers and, in particular,all aspects of Hogg’s relationship with Scottish Romanticism. Of particular Scott interest was 'Border Bards Together: Hogg, Scott and Leyden' by Gillian Hughes.

24) 'The Corporeal and the Spiritual in the Works of Walter Scott', Two-Day Conference, Sorbonne University, Paris, France, 5-6 July 2012

This international conference at Paris-Sorbonne University co-organized by D2I (VALE) and the Société Française d’Etudes Ecossaises called for papers on the following theme:

"Walter Scott often seems determined to erase the body from his texts, following the traditional Cartesian opposition between body and soul, the body being merely, to use Plato’s image, the tomb of the soul. Thus the novelist often chooses to focus only on his characters’ intellectual development, giving the reader so few details about their physical appearance that it is often quite difficult to picture them. Scott demonstrates his lack of interest in the material body even further – although, in this case he does transcend the dichotomy between body and soul – when he depicts the spectral body through images of disembodied beings.

In fact, it appears that what Scott cares little for is not the body itself but ordinary representations of it. He only finds it fascinating when it is either incomplete or immaterial – as in the case of ghosts for instance – or, on the contrary, when it is excessively present and materialized, in a Rabelais-like manner, when it is grotesque, misshapen, mutilated, dismembered or transgressive (a cross between male and female or between the human and the animal) or when it has turned into a corpse, embodying the ultimate victory of the matter over the spirit. This paradoxical attitude towards the body probably stems from the mixed feelings of attraction and repulsion which Scott himself experienced through his own infirmity and the repressive spirit of the XIXth century society as a whole. As the body sparks off sexual impulses and carnal desires, it is the inexpressible which must yet be expressed and written but in another form. Apparently absent from Scott’s texts, sexuality is nonetheless conveyed through transpositions, transfers from the animate to the inanimate as illustrated by the rape of the prison in The Heart of Mid-Lothian or the erotic treatment of the Scottish landscape.

In a figurative sense the body is also what holds several elements together, what brings together materially distinctive components to form a united and homogenous whole so the notions of domestic or political body and of the body of the nation can also be analyzed, as well as Scott’s textual body, discussing the ways in which uniqueness and homogeneity are achieved in spite of the various foreign bodies it borrows from."

25) 'Excavating Time: Uncovering and Recovering the Past in Word and Image', University Museums in Scotland and Scottish Word and Image Group Joint Conference 2012, University of Dundee, 6-8 July 2012

The joint conference of University Museums in Scotland and the Scottish Word and Image Group (SWIG) considered the processes by which the past might be accessed, preserved, represented, interpreted or 'fabricated' through distinctive interactions between visual and verbal media. It featured one paper of Scott interest: 'A "Good though Old-fashioned Library": Scenes of Nostalgic Reading in Walter Scott's Waverley, Guy Mannering, and The Antiquary' by Melinda Graefe (Flinders).

26) 'Locating Revolution: Place, Voice, Community, 1780-1820', Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Wales, 9-12 July 2012

This multi-disciplinary conference, jointly hosted by the Wales and the French Revolution project at the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies, the Centre for Romantic Studies, Aberystwyth University, and the Department of English, Swansea University, featured one paper of Scott interest: '"lka Land Has Its Ain Laugh": Land, Laughter and Law in Walter Scott’s The Heart of Mid-Lothian' by Andrew McInnes (Exeter).

27) 'City of Words: Writers, Readers and Critics in Edinburgh', Exhibition, Edinburgh University Library, 3 August-27 October 2012

To mark the 250th anniversary of Edinburgh University's English Department, this exhibition told the fascinating story of how the writing, reading and criticism of literature have been entwined in Edinburgh over the past quarter millennium. It showcased books, letters and other artefacts illustrating the life and work of writers (including Scott), critics and students involved in the study of literature at the University. It also showed how this study has been intimately interconnected with the literary life of the city, through diverse contacts between the University and Edinburgh writers, theatres, and publishing houses.

28) 'A Colloquium on The Antiquary', presented by William Payne and Lee A. Simpson, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, Hospitalfield, Arbroath, 5 August 2012

This year’s Edinburgh Sir Walter Scot Club Colloquium, on The Antiquary, was held at Hospitalfield House in Arbroath, East Angus. Regarded as one of the finest historic houses in Scotland, this is now also an arts centre, and is reputed to have provided a model for Scott’s depiction of Monkbarns in his novel. The discussion was led by Lee A. Simpson, the Club's Honorary Treasurer and Events Convener, and William Payne, Director at Hospitalfield, and there was also a tour of the house and buffet lunch. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

29) 'Emblems of Nationhood: Britishness 1707–1901', Multidisciplinary Conference, University of St Andrews, 10-12 August 2012

This conference, organized by the Schools of Art History, English, and Modern Languages at the University of St Andrews, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'The "Other" Nation: Scotland, Gypsies and Guy Mannering' by Alexandra Drayton (St Andrews) and 'Walter Scott's Waverley and Susan Ferrier's Marriage: Gendered Visions of the British Union' by Benjamine Toussaint (Sorbonne).

30) 'But an' ben wi' Burke and Hare', Reading by Caroline McCracken-Flesher, Edinburgh International Book Festival, 14 August 2012, 11.00-12.00

Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming) gave a reading from her monograph The Doctor Dissected: A Cultural Autopsy of the Burke and Hare Murders (Oxford University Press, 2012). Her study asks why the Burke and Hare case has continued to resonate with writers from Walter Scott (who refused publicly to comment on the scandal) and Robert Louis Stevenson, to Alasdair Gray and Ian Rankin today. Besides many articles on Scott, Prof. McCracken-Flesher is the author of Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Culture, Nation, and the New Scottish Parliament (Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2007).

31) 'Romantic Prospects' 20th Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism Conference, Neuchâtel, Switzerland, 15-19 August 2012

The 20th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), co-hosted by co-hosted by the Université de Neuchâtel and the Universität Zürich, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Charmed Prospects: Wordsworth’s and Scott’s Viewpoints of Ruin' by Susan Oliver (Essex).

32) 'Reiving and Bereaving: Walter Scott and the Rich Ballad Tradition of the Scottish Borders', Talk by Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine with Musical Accompaniment, Innerleithen Music Festival, St Ronan's Wells Visitor Centre, Innerleithen, Scottish Borders, 19 August 2012

As part of the Innerleithen Music Festival, folklore scholars Lucy Macrae and Kaye McAlpine from the School of Celtic and Scottish Studies, Edinburgh presented a journey deep into the ‘Debateable Lands’ of the Scottish Borders through the ballads collected in Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. The ballads were brought to life by Borders singers Kathy Hobkirk, Elsa Lemaitre, and Henry Douglas, and acclaimed young traditional singer Naomi Harvey. Set against a visual backdrop, the event wove together history, myth, landscape, and song.

33) 'Forest Pitch', Selkirk, 25 August 2012

Forest Pitch was an arts and soccer project which commemorated Sir Walter Scott’s role in organizing the Carterhaugh Ba’ football match of 1815 which saw a team drawn from the estates of the Duke of Buccleuch take on the men of Selkirk, Hawick, and Gala in a contest involving hundreds of players and very few rules. A contribution to the Cultural Olympiad, the event saw some 60 players, many of them people new to Scotland, take part in football matches on a woodland pitch on the Buccleuch Estates. The work of Edinburgh artist Craig Coulthard, its aim was to raise questions about Scottish culture and identity at a crucial moment in the nation’s history.

34) ESSE 2012, 11th Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey, 4-8 September 2012

The 11th Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, hosted by Bogaziçi University, will feature one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Saladin as the Other in Walter Scott’s The Talisman' by Jacqueline Jondot (Toulouse le Mirail).

35) 'Out and in: The Decant and Recant of Sir Walter Scott's Collection at Abbotsford', Talk by Joanna Cook and Matthew Withey, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 6 September 2012

Joanna Cook and Matthew Withey are respectively Project Conservator and Curator at Scott's home of Abbotsford House. Their talk took place shortly after the planned opening of the new Visitors Centre at Abbotsford. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

36) 'Scott, the Brothers Grimm, and the Lost Union', Lecture by Christopher Harvie, Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, 11 October 2012

In a lecture jointly hosted by the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club and the English Department of Edinburgh University, Prof. Christopher Harvie addressed Scott's German literary connections on the 200th anniversary of the publication of the Brothers Grimm's Children's and Household Tales. Prof. Harvie has recently retired as Professor of British and Irish Studies at the University of Tübingen. Amongst many other works, he is author of Scotland and Nationalism (1977), The Centre of Things (1991), The Rise of Regional Europe (1993), and Floating Commonwealth (2008). Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

37) 'Popular Antiquities: Folklore and Archaeology', Two-day Conference, Institute of Archaeology, University College of London, 13-14 October 2012

This two-day conference, jointly organised by the Institute of Archaeology, University College London and the Folklore Society, presented papers exploring the relationship and interaction between archaeology and folklore around the world. It featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Placing the Past in Walter Scott’s Minstrelsy of the Scottish
Border
'
by Lucy MacRae (Edinburgh).

38) PAMLA 2012, 110th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, Seattle University, 19-21 October 2012

The 110th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, hosted by Seattle University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Scott the "Versifier" in the Age of Wordsworth' by Natasha Tessone (Oberlin College).

39) 'The Discovery of Scotland: Walter Scott and the Invention of World Literature', Scottish Literature International Lecture by Prof. Ian Duncan, The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, 7 November 2012

Prof. Ian Duncan gave the inaugural Scottish Literature International Lecture (organized by the Association for Scottish Literary Studies), showing how Scott placed Scotland at the centre of the world's literary stage, influenced writers around the globe, and laid the foundations for modern concepts of fiction and the novel. Prof. Duncan is holder of the Florence Green Bixby Chair in English, University of California, Berkeley, and author of numerous works on Scott including Scott's Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (2007).

40) 'Editing Scott's Last Edition', Talk by J. H. Alexander, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 15 November 2012

Dr J. H. (Ian) Alexander's talk coincided with the publication of the final two volumes of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (EEWN), which are comprised of newly edited versions of the Introduction and Notes that Scott wrote for the 'Magnum Opus' edition of 1829-33. Dr Alexander, who has already been directly involved in editing no fewer than seven of the existing volumes in the EEWN, is a leading textual scholar and authority on Scott, and his talk threw new light on Scott's activities in his last years and the final organisation of the Waverley Novels in a form that influenced generations of readers. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

41) 'Reiving and Bereaving: Walter Scott and the Rich Ballad Tradition of the Scottish Borders', Talk by Lucy MacRae and Kaye McAlpine with Musical Accompaniment, Heritage Hub, Hawick, Scottish Borders, 1 December 2012

Fresh from their success at the Innerleithen Music Festival, folklore scholars Lucy Macrae and Kaye McAlpine from the School of Celtic and Scottish Studies, Edinburgh presented an afternoon of ballad singing, Borders lore and images focusing on the Border Ballads of Scott’s Minstrelsy of The Scottish Border accompanied by traditional singers Henry Douglas, Elsa Le Maitre, Kathy Hobkirk, and Naomi Harvey.

42) Scott’s Selkirk 2012, Selkirk, Scottish Borders, 1 December 2012

Scott’s Selkirk is an annual event marking the town’s association with Scott. Visitors are invited to experience and enjoy Selkirk as it was during Scott’s sherrifdom in the early nineteenth century. Some of his cases are re-enacted in the Courtroom, including, on this occasion, ‘The Graveyard Grievance’ and (new for this year) ‘The Seamy Work o' the Weaver’. Dr Sandra McNeil, Learning Officer with the Abbotsford Trust, gave an informal talk Scott, his links with Selkirk, and the redevelopment project currently taking place at Abbotsford.There was also street entertainment, live traditional music, a torchlight procession, children’s activities, craft stalls, and independent shops.

43) 'The Discovery of Scotland: Walter Scott and the Invention of World Literature', Lecture by Prof. Ian Duncan, Universität Vechta, Germany, 11 December 2012

Prof. Ian Duncan gave a talk (previously delivered as the inaugural Scottish Literature International Lecture) in the English Department of the Universität Vechta, showing how Scott placed Scotland at the centre of the world's literary stage, influenced writers around the globe, and laid the foundations for modern concepts of fiction and the novel. Prof. Duncan is holder of the Florence Green Bixby Chair in English, University of California, Berkeley, and author of numerous works on Scott including Scott's Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (2007).

2011

1) 'Narrating Lives', 126th MLA Annual Convention, Los Angeles, 6-9 January 2011

The 126th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association featured the following papers of Scott interest: Miranda Burgess (British Columbia), 'Walter Scott’s Vehicle', Ian Duncan (Berkeley), 'Late Scott and the End of Man', Anthony S. Jarrells (South Carolina), 'The Romantic East: Porter’s Tales and Scott’s Chronicles', Celeste G. Langan (Berkeley), 'Scott's Two Lives of Napoléon', Caroline McCracken-Flesher, 'Walter Scott's Romanticism—In Performance', Susan Oliver (Essex), 'Singing the North: Myth, Epic, and Tragedy in Operatic Scotland', Gina Terry (Texas A&M), 'True Views of Scotland: Illustrated Supplements to Sir Walter Scott's Work', and Matthew Wickman (Brigham Young), 'Scott in Space'.

2) 'Scott, India, and the Muslim Gentleman', Talk by Dr Robert Irvine, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 3 February 2011

Dr Irvine is a Senior Lecturer in English and Scottish Literature at the University of Edinburgh and author of Enlightenment and Romance: Gender and Agency in Smollett and Scott (2000). His talk focussed on Chronicles of the Canongate and The Talisman, the latter of which Dr Irvine sees as reflecting the British ruling-class encounter with its Islamic opposite-number in India. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

3) 'Romanticism and the Tyrannies of Distance', First Biennial Conference of the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia, University of Sydney, Australia, 10-12 February 2011

The first biennial conference of the newly founded Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (RSAA), hosted by the University of Sydney, included two papers of particular interest to Scott scholars: 'Scott’s "Airy Condescension": The Talisman and Orientalism' by Silvia Mergenthal (Konstanz) and 'Reading Scottish Romanticism from Australia: Beginnings to 1837' by Graham Tulloch (Flinders).

4) 'Money/Myths', 32nd Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, University of New Mexico, 3-6 March 2011

The 32nd Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, hosted by the University of New Mexico featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott and the Myth of British Virtue: Romance and the Linen Trade' by Kathryn Pratt Russell (Clayton State).

5) 'Border Trouble: "World Literature" and the Case of Scottish Balladry', Lecture with Music, by Prof. Maureen N. McLane, University of Edinburgh, 16 March 2011

Maureen N. McLane, Associate Professor of English at New York University, delivered the Annual SWINC (Scottish Writing in the Nineteenth Century) Public Lecture. Prof. McLane is the author of Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge UP, 2008) and Romanticism and the Human Sciences (CUP, 2000, 2006). She also co-edited The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (2008). Offering poetic and musical examples, her lecture explore the use and abuse of Scottish balladry and song from the eighteenth century until now.

6) ASECS 2011 Annual Meeting, Sheraton Wall Centre Hotel, Vancouver BC, 17-20 March 2011

The 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) featured four papers of particular Scott interest: '"To one thing constant never": Problematizing Historical Experience in Edgeworth and Scott' by George Drake (Central Washington State), '"The time …is so elastic": Scott, Gibbon, and the Romance of the Lower Empire' by Kristian Kerr (Chicago), 'The Material Culture of Commemoration: The Scott Monument and the Reformed Nation' by Tom Mole (McGill University), and 'The Eighteenth-Century Walter Scott (1815–1935)' by Jason Solinger (Mississippi).

7) 'Off Centre, North and South: A Symposium on Scotland and Sicily', Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, 18-19 March 2011

Hosted by the School of Humanities at Flinders University, this symposium on connections, parallels, contrasts and comparisons between Scotland and Sicily featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Turning Points: Scotland and Sicily, Scott and Lampedusa' by Graham Tulloch (Flinders). Besides publishing several articles on Scott, Prof. Tulloch has edited the following volumes for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels: Ivanhoe (1997), The Siege of Malta, and, Bizarro (2008; with J. H. Alexander and Judy King) and The Shorter Fiction (2009; with Judy King).

8) 'Speaking Nature', Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Conference, Pitzer College, Claremont, California, 31 March-3 April 2011

The 2011 conference of the INCS focussed on how the nineteenth century conceived of and constructed nature and the relation of human beings to nature. Hosted by Pitzer College, it featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Scott and Edinburgh: Memorializing Edinburgh's Old Town in The Heart of Midlothian' by Richard Hill (Chaminade) and 'Moral Necessities: The Natural Figures of Scott's Narrative Transgressions' by Margaret Kolb (California, Berkeley).

9) 'World Literature/Comparative Literature', ACLA 2011, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada, 31 March-3 April 2011

The 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), hosted by Simon Fraser University, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Pushkin and Scott, Genre and Commerce' by Luba Golburt (California, Berkeley). Also of interest was 'Ballad Crossings: World Literature and the English and Scottish Popular Ballads' by Caroline Gelmi (Tufs).

10) International Conference on Narrative, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, 7-10 April 2011

The 2011 Narrative Conference was an interdisciplinary forum addressing all dimensions of narrative theory and practice. Sponsored by Washington University in St. Louis and the International Society for the Study of Narrative, it featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott, Charles Dickens and – Harrison Ainsworth?: Telling the Story of the British Novel in Nineteenth-Century Germany?' by Antje Anderson (Hastings College).

11) 'Scott, Newman and Abbotsford', a talk by Lt Cdr Dairmid Gunn OBE, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 14 April 2011

Lt Commander Dairmid Gunn is well-known to members of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club as one of its most established Council members. His talk dealt with affinities between Scott and Cardinal Henry Newman, whose influence on Abbotsford is tangibly evident in the Chapel there, built by Charlotte and James Robert Hope-Scott in the wake of their conversion to Roman Catholicism in 1851. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

12) 6th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, 12-15 May 2011

The 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, sponsored by the Medieval Institute of Western Michigan University, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Recovering a Not so Imaginary Past: Medievalism in Scott’s Harold the Dauntless' by Renée Ward (Wilfred Laurier University) and '"Thou art no Christian": Medievalism and the Suppression of the Jewishness in Children’s Versions of Ivanhoe' by Wendy Love Anderson (Washington University in St. Louis).

13) 'Romantic Identities: Selves in Society, 1770-1835', British Association for Romantic Studies Early Career and Postgraduate Conference 2011, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London, 13 May 2011

The 2011 Early Career and Postgraduate Conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) was hosted by the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '(Re)covering the Self: The Subaltern and the Adoption of Disguise in Scott's Rob Roy and Redgauntlet' by Kang-yen Chiu (Glasgow). Kang-yen Chiu is preparing a doctoral thesis on ‘Self as Other: Hospitality, Nation and Empire in Walter Scott’s Waverley Novels’.

14) 'Walter Scott and the Painting of Scottish History', Talk by Dr John Morrison, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 19 May 2011

Dr John Morrison, Senior Lecturer at Aberdeen University, gave an illustrated talk on Scott and historical painting. Dr Morrison is the author of Painting the Nation: Identity and Nationalism in Scottish Painting, 1800-1920, which features two chapters on the influence of Scott (see Morrison 2003a and Morrison 2003b). He also curated the exhibition 'Sir William Allan: Artist, Adventurer' at the City Art Centre, Edinburgh, 30 June-6 October 2001. Details, including venue and ticketing, from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

15) 'SCOTLAND-ScottLAND', International Interdisciplinary Conference, Castle Schönburg, near Bingen on the Rhine, Germany, 26-29 May 2011

This interdisciplinary conference focussed on the people and cultural phenomena that influenced Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. It was also concerned with the impact Scott’s ballad collection had on Scot(t)land, Europe and Romanticism in general. The keynote speech was delivered by Stuart Kelly, author of Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation, which argued that Scott 'changed the entire world’s perception of Scotland, and Scotland’s perception of itself'. Further plenary lectures were delivered by David Hewitt (Aberdeen) on 'Scott in the 1790s: Some Revisionist Views', Penny Fielding (Edinburgh) on 'Black Dwarves: Scott, the Borders and Radicalism', and Paul Barnaby (Edinburgh) on 'The Scott Digital Archive and other Online Resources'. The conference also marked the foundation of the Society for Scottish Studies in Europe.

16) 'Scott, William Stark, and the Cottage That Never Was: Early Planning at Abbotsford, 1811-1812', Talk by Dr Michael Buck and Prof. Peter Garside, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 16 June 2011

Dr Michael Buck (Indiana Wesleyan University) and Prof. Peter Garside (Edinburgh) presented new findings on the ‘picturesque’ cottage originally planned at Abbotsford by Scott, after a design by the Glasgow architect William Stark, which in the event never came to fruition. Dr Buck is the author of several conference presentations and scholarly articles on Scott. Peter Garside is Professor of Bibliography and Textual Studies at the University of Edinburgh and was the founding Chair of the Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. Among many Scott-related publications, he has edited The Black Dwarf (1993), Guy Mannering (1999), and Waverley (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and The Visionary for University College Cardiff Press (1984). Dr Buck and Prof. Garside have recently collaborated on the article 'New Materials Discovered at Abbotsford' in Journal of the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society, 5 (2010). Further details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

17) 'Walter Scott: Sheriff and Outlaw', 9th Quadrennial International Scott Conference, Laramie, Wyoming, USA, 5-9 July 2011

Scott was a lawyer, friend to the great, and literary authority, yet he became so by breaking all the rules. 'Walter Scott: Sheriff and Outlaw', the 9th Quadrennial International Scott Conference, encouraged new understanding of Scott’s innovations, and his contribution to literary and other fields up to the present day. The conference offered almost 100 papers, plenaries, workshops, roundtables, advice from journal editors, and a trip to see the west Walter Scott made. Plenary lectures were delivered by Jenni Calder (National Museums of Scotland) on 'Sir Walter Goes West: Scott’s Frontier Legacy' and Judith Wilt (Boston College) on 'Piratical Paradigms: Scott’s Pirates and Successors'.

(See below for details of the 7th and 8th Quadrennial Scott Conferences.)

18) 'Freedom, Religion, and Gender', 28th International Social Philosophy Conference, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 21-23 July 2011

The 28th International Social Philosophy Conference, organized by the North American Society for Social Philosophy, and hosted by Marquette University, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Religion, Freedom, and Gender in Three Novels by Walter Scott' by Norman A. Fischer (Kent State).

19) 'Enlightenment, Romanticism & Nation', 12th International Biennial Conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies, 28-31 July 2011

The University of Glasgow and the School of Critical Studies hosted the 12th International Biennial Conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS), on the theme of 'Enlightenment, Romanticism & Nation'. The conference sought to address two specific areas: first, the relationship between the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism (British, American, European, etc.); and second, the study of Scottish, Irish, and Welsh literature in relation to their distinct national cultures, and to the overarching claims of ‘Britishness’. The following papers were of particular Scott interest: Kang-Yen Chiu (Glasgow), 'A Postcolonial Reading of Hospitality in Scott’s Rob Roy and Redgauntlet', Daniel Cook (Bristol), 'Walter Scott Edits Jonathan Swift', John Havard (Chicago), '"Progressive and Digressive, at the Same Time": Sterne’s Waverley Novel', Kristian Kerr (Chicago), 'Scott: Vernacular Classicism', Simon Kövesi (Oxford Brookes), 'Cockney Comedy after Keats, Scott and Hunt: The Politics of J. H. Reynolds in the 1820s', Claire Lamont (Newcastle), 'Enlightenment History in Scott’s Introduction to the Magnum Edition of the Waverley Novels', Lindsay Levy (Advocates’ Library, Edinburgh), 'Walter Scott, Byron and William Thomas Fitzgerald', Matthew Ocheltree (Harvard), 'Romancing the Imperial Self: Genre, Identity and Late Style in Walter Scott’s Crusader Fiction', and Joseph Rezek (Boston), ‘Hail to the Chief: Walter Scott and the Americanization of Scottish Nationalism during the war of 1812’.

20) 'Romanticism and Independence', 19th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, Park City, Utah, 11-14 August 2011

The 19th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), co-hosted by Brigham Young University and the University of Utah, included the following papers of particular Scott interest: Hannah J. Doherty (Stanford), 'The Minerva Press and Walter Scott’s Readers: Innovation and Identity', Jeff Jackson (Rice), 'Goodbye to All That: The Journey Away from Edinburgh as Enlightenment Metropolis in Sir Walter Scott’s Guy Mannering (1815) and The Antiquary (1816)', Matthew Ocheltree (Harvard), 'Romancing the Imperial Self: Genre, Identity and Late Style in Walter Scott’s Crusader Fiction', Padma Rangarajan (Colorado, Boulder), 'Colonial Interdependence: Soldering Scott’s Chronicles of the Canongate', John Savarese (Rutgers), 'Lyrical Impairment in Waverley', Olga Volkova (Indiana), 'Derivative and Uniquely Russian: Historicity in Scott’s The Bride of Lammermoor and Gogol’s Dead Souls'.

21) A Colloquium on Redgauntlet, introduced by Professor Kathryn Sutherland and Professor David Hewitt, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 13 August 2011

Professor Hewitt is editor-in-chief of the recently completed Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (EEWN) and Co-Director of the Walter Scott Research Centre. In addition to publishing many important articles on Scott, he has edited Scott on Himself: A Selection of the Autobiographical Writings of Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1981) and Scott and His Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, c1983) (with J. H. Alexander). For the EEWN, he has edited The Antiquary (1995), Redgauntlet (with G. A. M. Wood, 1996), The Heart of Mid-Lothian (with Alison Lumsden, 2004), and, most recently, Rob Roy (2008). Professor Sutherland is Professorial Fellow in English at St Anne’s College, Oxford. She edited Redgauntlet for Oxford University Press in 1985. More information from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club

22) 'Retuning the Harp of the North: Editing Scott's Poetry', Talk by Dr Alison Lumsden, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 15 September 2011

Dr Lumsden is a General Editor of the recently completed Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels and Co-Director of the University of Aberdeen's Walter Scott Research Centre. For the Edinburgh Edition, she has edited Peveril of the Peak (2007) and co-edited The Pirate (2001), The Heart of Mid-Lothian (2004), and Reliquiae Trotcosienses (2004). Her monograph Walter Scott and the Limits of Language was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2010. She has recently been awarded a grant from the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland to begin work on a scholarly edition of Scott's poetry. Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club

23) 'Illustrating the Waverley Novels', Lecture by Professor Peter Garside, Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, 13 October 2011

Peter Garside is Professor of Bibliography and Textual Studies at the University of Edinburgh and was the founding Chair of the Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. Among many Scott-related publications, he has edited The Black Dwarf (1993), Guy Mannering (1999), and Waverley (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and The Visionary for University College Cardiff Press (1984). Prof. Garside recently directed the project Illustrating Scott: A Database of Printed Illustrations to the Waverley Novels, 1814-1901. Further details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

24) 'Textual Manipulation', Annual Conference of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand, Barr Smith Library, University of Adelaide, 3-4 November 2011

The Annual Conference of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand, held at Barr Smith Library, University of Adelaide, included one paper of Scott interest: 'Readers of Novels: Reading Sir Walter Scott's The Antiquary' by Brian McMullin (Monash)

25) 'Reinventing Romanticism', 2011 International Conference on Romanticism, Montreal, 3-5 November 2011

The 2011 meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Impossible Things: Scott’s Ivanhoe and the Limits of Exchange' by Daniela Garofalo (Oklahoma). Dr Garofalo is the author of Manly Leaders in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (State University of New York Press, 2009). A print version of this paper has subsequently appeared in the monograph Women, Love, and Commodity Culture in British Romanticism (Farnham: Ashgate, 2012)

26) 'The Power of Poetry in the Modern World', 2011 SAMLA Conference, Loews Hotel Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, 4-6 November 2011

The 2011 Annual Conference of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Marginalization of Adaptation: Sir Walter Scott’s "Death of the Laird’s Jock" and the Birth of Modern Adaptation Theory' by Glenn Jellenik (South Carolina).

27) Scott's Selkirk 2011, 3-4 December 2011, Selkirk, Scottish Borders

Scott’s Selkirk is an annual event marking the town’s association with Scott. Visitors are invited to experience and enjoy Selkirk as it was during Scott’s sherrifdom in the early nineteenth century. Some of his cases are re-enacted in the Courtroom, including, on this occasion, two never previously presented: ‘The Tall Tale of the Tushielaw Trout’ and ‘The Graveyard Grievance’. There was also street entertainment, live traditional music, performances from Selkirk’s highly regarded Flute, Silver and Pipe Bands, craft stalls, and independent shops.

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2010

1) 'Time and Space', 39th Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, St Hugh's College, University of Oxford, 5-7 January 2010

The Annual Conference of the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, held at St Hugh's College, University of Oxford, addressed the understandings and uses of concepts of time, space, and periodization throughout the long eighteenth century. It featured two papers on Sir Walter Scott: Suchitra Choudhury (Open University), 'Scottish Storytelling and the India Shawl: Metafiction, Authenticity and Colonialism in Walter Scott' (on 'The Surgeon's Daughter') and Katrin Berndt (Bremen), 'Sir Walter Scott’s Vision of Britishness in Redgauntlet (1824)'. Two further papers were of particular Scott interest. In 'William Godwin's Waverley: Radical Politics and the Historical Novel', Andrew McInnes (Exeter) imagined that Godwin wrote the anonymously published Waverley, as Keats and other commentators initially speculated. In 'Alternative Histories: Jane West’s The Loyalists (1812)', Fiona Price (Chichester) explored Jane West's unacknowledged role in the development of the historical novel, contrasting her post-revolutionary feminism with Scott's 'bow-wow strain'. Click here for the conference site and here for abstracts of the conference papers.

2) Treasure of the Month, Mitchell Library, Glasgow, February 2010

The Mitchell Library, Europe's largest public reference library, displayed some rare and interesting items from its collection of Sir Walter Scott material as its 'Treasure of the Month' for February 2010. Contact the Library for further information.

3) 'Sir Walter Scott and Thomas Moore', Address by Kath Hardie, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 11 February 2010

Kath Hardie is author of Sir Walter Scott: An Illustrated Historical Guide (Norwich: Jarrold, 2001). Her talk was accompanied with music and songs by Ian Scott and the Scottish folk trio Chapter 4. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

4) 'Contemporary Canon: Cultural and Intellectual Dialogues', Coordinates of Comparison 2010, 4th Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference, University of Alberta, 12-13 March 2010

The 4th Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference ('Coordinates of Comparison') hosted by the University of Alberta Comparative Literature Program featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Popular Reception by Dramatic Adaptation: Walter Scott’s The Heart of Mid-Lothian' by David Buchanan (Alberta).

5) 41st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Hotel Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM, 18-21 March 2010

The 41st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), held in the Hotel Albuquerque, included two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott’s Unrepresentative Anecdotes' by Sean Barry (Rutgers) and '"Struck partly with horror, partly with Compassion": Impressions of Culpability and the Transition to the Epistolary Mode in Walter Scott’s Novels' by Nicole Wright (Yale). For further information see the conference site and programme.

6) 'Journeys', 18th Annual Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Women Writers Conference, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 8-11 April 2010

The 18th Annual Conference of the BWWA (18th- and 19th-Century British Women Writers Association), held at Texas A&M University, considered journeys -- the spatial, personal, fantastic, artistic, and social movements --
that occur in British women's writing. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Back to the Present: Margaret Oliphant, Walter Scott, and Temporal Loops' by Elsie Michie (Louisiana State). Prof. Michie is the author of Outside the Pale: Cultural Exclusion, Gender Difference, and the Victorian Woman Writer (Cornell University Press, 1993) and Charlotte Brontë’s 'Jane Eyre': A Casebook (Oxford University Press, 2006).Click here for the conference site and here for a schedule of papers.

7) 25th Anniversary Conference, International Society for the Study of Narrative, Cleveland, Ohio, 8-11 April 2010

The 25th Anniversary Conference of the International Society for the Study of Narrative, held at various locations in Cleveland, Ohio, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Narrative Surrogacy in Scott’s and Edgeworth’s Nationalist Novels' by Susan Howard (Duquesne). Prof. Howard is working on A Critical Edition of Sir Walter Scott’s 'Waverley' for Broadview Press. Click here for the conference site and here for the programme.

8) 'La Traduction des textes multilingues', One-Day Conference, Université Jean Monnet, St. Étienne, France, 16 April 2010

Organized by the Centre Interdisciplinaire d'Etudes et de Recherches sur l'Expression Contemporaine (CIEREC) of the Université Jean Monnet, St. Étienne, this conference on the translation of multilingual texts featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Le Plurilinguisme national d'Écosse: de Walter Scott à Andrew Greig' by Jean Berton (Toulouse).

9) 'Border Trouble: "World Literature" and the Case of Scottish Balladry', Public Lecture by Prof. Maureen N. McLane, Edinburgh University, 22 April 2010

What is a ballad? What is a song? What is romanticism? What is world literature? And what does the case of Scottish balladry have to say to any of these questions? Ever since the eighteenth-century ballad revival, scholars and songsters have argued about what makes a ballad a ballad, and what makes a Scottish ballad Scottish. Such questions have taken new directions with the emergence of ‘world literature.’ Yet all too often discussions of world literature neglect to explore just how such literatures get produced by mobilizing oral traditions. Offering poetic and musical examples, Prof. Maureen McLane (New York) explored the use and abuse of Scottish balladry and song from the eighteenth century until now. Prof. McLane is the author of Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and Romanticism and the Human Sciences (CUP, 2000). She also co-edited The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (2008). For further information contact the event organizer.

10) 'Half Dust, Half Deity; or, Science, Nature & the Supernatural in the Long Eighteenth Century', Annual Eighteenth Century & Romantic Studies Graduate Conference, University of Cambridge, 24-25 April 2010

The University of Cambridge's Annual Eighteenth Century & Romantic Studies Graduate Conference featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"During his fiery ride": The Importance of Walter Scott's Horses and Dogs' by Simon Webb (Jesus College, Cambridge). For more information see the conference site and programme.

11) The Ragged Lion, Two Performances by the Rowan Tree Theatre Company, Abbotsford House, 24-25 April 2010

The Rowan Tree Theatre Company presented two performances of The Ragged Lion at Abbotsford House on Saturday 24th and Sunday 25th April 2010, accompanied by live music. The play, based on Allan Massie's 1994 novel of the same name, presents Scott in the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis of 1825-26. In the solitude of his study, facing a lifetime of toil to repay his debts, he wrestles with the ghosts and demons of his and his country’s past. Click here for a poster and contact Abbotsford House for further information.

12) '"A Mighty Treasure": An Illustrated Guide to James C. Corson's Collection of Scottiana', Address by Dr Paul Barnaby, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 13 May 2010

Dr Barnaby (Edinburgh University Library) is editor of this website and has published articles on the reception and translation of Scottish literature. His talk provided an introduction to Edinburgh University Library's major Corson Collection of Walter Scott material. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

13) 50th Annual Conference of the Société des Anglicistes de l’Enseignement Supérieur, Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille 3, France, 21-23 May 2010

The 50th annual conference of the Société des Anglicistes de l’Enseignement Supérieur (SAES), hosted by the Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille 3, included a Scottish Studies workshop organized by the Société Française d'Etudes Ecossaises. This featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'L’Horizon de Napoléon Bonaparte à travers l’oeuvre de Walter Scott: The Life of Napoleon Buonaparte' by Florence Grimaldi (Corte). Click here for the programme.

14) Lady of the Lake Colloquium, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 23 May 2010

The Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club held a colloquium at the Harbour Cafe, Loch Vennachar, to celebrate the bicentenary of the publication of Scott's The Lady of the Lake. Guest speakers were Dr Alison Lumsden (Aberdeen University) and Dr Nicola Watson (Open University). Dr Lumsden is Co-Director of Aberdeen University's Walter Scott Research Centre; she edited Peveril of the Peak (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels and co-edited The Pirate (2001), The Heart of Mid-Lothian (2004), and Reliquiae Trotcosienses (2004). She is currently completing a monograph entitled Walter Scott and the Limits of Language. Dr Watson edited The Antiquary (1999) for Oxford World Classics and is author of Revolution and the Form of the English Novel, 1790-1825 (Oxford University Press, 1994) and The Literary Tourist: Readers and Places in Romantic and Victorian Britain (Palgrave, 2006). Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

15) Multimedia Concert on the Life and Times of Sir Walter Scott, Abbotsford House, 27 May 2010

Prof. David Purdie, Chairman of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, presented a multi-media concert on the life and times of Scott at the writer's Abbotsford home on Thursday 27th May 2010. The talk was illustrated by images now released from the Scottish Cultural Archive by permission of RCAHMS (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. The presentation was interspersed with readings from Scott’s prose and poetry by Alisdair Hutton and Rose McBain, and with songs from his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border by Hilary Bell and Henry Douglas. Contact Abbotsford House for further information.

16) 'ScottsLand: Celebrate the Language of the Landscape', Trossachs, Scotland, June-September 2010

'ScottsLand: Celebrate the Language of the Landscape' marked the 200th anniversary of the publication of Scott's The Lady of the Lake, which transformed popular perspectives on landscape and generated the first major surge of tourists to the Trossachs and Scotland. From June to October 2010, a diverse programme of cultural and literary events, promoted by Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park, took place throughout the Trossachs to celebrate the poem, the heritage and the landscapes. They included: an art and literary trail, the Chase sports event, a film festival, a literary conference, and a host of exhibitions, guided walks and cruises. See the event site for a full programme.

17) 'Genres and Historicity: Text, Cotext, Context', 12th Annual Conference of the English Department of the University of Bucharest, 3-5 June 2010

The 12th Annual Conference of the English Department of Bucharest University featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Metamorphoses of the Covenanters in Scottish Historical Fiction' by Cristian Stefan Vîjea (Bucharest). Click here for a full programme.

18) 'La donna del lago de Rossini au coeur du romantisme européen', Study Day, École normale supérieure, Paris, 4 June 2010

Co-organized by the École normale supérieure and the Centre de Littérature et poétique comparées of the Université de Paris Ouest-Nanterre-La Défense, this study day studied Rossini's operatic adaptation of Scott's The Lady of the Lake within the context of European Romanticism. Two papers were of particular interest to Scott scholars: 'Walter Scott et l’Opéra' by Francis Claudon (Paris XII-Val de Marne) and 'De la geste héroïque de Walter Scott au melodramma de Rossini: le livret d’Andrea Leone Tottola' by Liliane Lascoux (C.R.L.C, Paris IV). Click here for a full programme.

19) 'Scott, the Trossachs, and the Tourists', ASLS Annual Conference, Balloch, Scotland, 5-6 June 2010

The 2010 Annual Conference of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies (ASLS) was held in the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park, with the support of the Park Authority, to mark the bicentenary of the publication of Scott's The Lady of the Lake. It focussed on Scott's work in general, The Lady of the Lake in particular, the influence of the landscape on literature, and the impact of literature on the development of literary tourism in Scotland. The following papers dealt specifically with Scott's work: Alistair Durie (Stirling), ‘Scott is Scottland: Did Scott Create Scottish Tourism?’, David Hewitt (Aberdeen), ‘Walter Scott’s Rob Roy’, Alison Lumsden (Aberdeen),‘The Lady of the Lake: A Poem for the Twenty-First Century’, Murdo Macdonald (Dundee), ‘Rethinking Scott, Art and the Highlands’, and Nicola Watson (Open University), ‘Scott and the Appeal of Literary Tourism’. For full programme and further information see the conference site. The conference proceedings have subsequently been published as Literary Tourism, the Trossachs, and Walter Scott, ed. Ian Brown (Glasgow: Scottish Literature International, 2012).

20) 'Scott-Land: The Author Who Invented a Nation', Address by Stuart Kelly, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 24 June 2010

Stuart Kelly is Literary Editor of Scotland on Sunday and author of Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation (Edinburgh: Polygon, 2010) which he describes as a 'mixture of biography, reportage, criticism, and cultural history'. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

21) 'Locating Stevenson', 6th Biennial Stevenson Conference, University of Stirling, 8-10 July 2010

The 6th biennial Stevenson conference, hosted by the Department of English Studies, University of Stirling, featured two papers which dealt, in particular, with Stevenson's debt to Sir Walter Scott: ‘The Questionable Failure of Catriona by Donald Mackenzie (Glasgow) and ‘The Strange Case of Weir and St. Ives: Stevenson’s Last Adventures in Narration’ by Saverio Tomaiuolo (Cassino). See the conference site for further details. (See D. Mackenzie 2011 for an expanded print version of Donald Mackenzie's paper.)

22) 'Recycling Myths, Inventing Nations', Three-Day International Conference, Aberystwyth University, Wales, 14-16 July 2010

This conference, hosted by Aberystwyth University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Black Dwarf and Radical Satire: Interrogating Britishness from the Margin' by Jing-Huey Hwang (National Taiwan University).  It explored how Thomas Jonathan Wooler’s radical weekly The Black Dwarf (1817-24) appropriated its marginalized but supernatural narrator from Scott’s novel of the same title. For further information, see abstracts and conference programme.

23) 'James Hogg’s Borders', Bi-Annual James Hogg Society Conference, University of Konstanz, Germany, 14-17 July 2010

Co-hosted by the James Hogg Society and the Department of English, University of Konstanz, this conference sought both to embed James Hogg in his actual historical and cultural context, the Scottish Borders, and to employ the 'borders' motif metaphorically to explore Hogg's creative transgression of, for instance, the boundaries of language or genre. However, papers were invited on all topics related to the life and works of James Hogg, as well as Hogg's literary connections and influence. The conference organisers also especially welcomed papers that addressed Hogg's reception in Continental Europe, as well as papers that made connections between Hogg's works and European writers. Following the recent death of Douglas Mack, founder of the James Hogg Society, the conference also hosted the first of a series of 'Mack Lectures' to celebrate his life and work. For further information, contact Prof. Silvia Mergenthal.

24) 'Scott-land', Stuart Kelly in Conversation with Andrew Crumey, Abbotsford House, 15 July 2010

Author, critic and Literary Editor of Scotland on Sunday, Stuart Kelly, discussed his new book Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation (Edinburgh: Polygon, 2010) at Sir Walter Scott's home of Abbotsford. In conversation with novelist Andrew Crumey, the author considered the extent of Scott's influence on the image of Scotland and his impact on the life of the nation. For further information, email events@scottsabbotsford.co.uk.

25) 'Abbotsford Revisited: A Dramatised Reading', The Mercators, Diverse Attractions, Edinburgh Fringe Festival, 9-14 August 2010

As part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the Mercators theatre group in association with Diverse Attractions presented Abbotsford Revisited, a dramatised reading devised by Alan Richardson. The performance was in the form of a drama-documentary relating Scott's life and times, interspersed with readings of his poetry and dramatised extracts from his novels. Click here for venue and ticket details.

26) 'The Influence of Walter Scott Examined', Debate Led by Stuart Kelly, Edinburgh Book Festival, 15 August 2010

Stuart Kelly's Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation (Edinburgh: Polygon, 2010) argues that Scott was nothing less than the architect of everything we now associate with Scottish national identity. In this debate, a panel, led by Kelly, discussed the extent of Scott’s influence. Part of the Edinburgh Book Festival, this event was supported by Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. For further details see the festival programme.

27) 'Book Culture from Below', SHARP 2010, University of Helsinki, 17-20 August 2010

The 18th annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, held at the University of Helsinki, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Scott‘s Minstrelsy and Victorian Ballad Collections:
Authorship, Editing, and Authority' by Yuri Cowan (Ghent).

28) 'Romantic Mediations', 18th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, Coast Plaza Hotel, Vancouver, BC, 18-22 August 2010

The 18th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), held at the Coast Plaza Hotel, Vancouver, B.C., included a panel on Scott's The Antiquary, featuring the following papers: Hala Herbly (Texas), 'Walter Scott and the Impossible Figure of the Female Antiquary', Alina A. Romo (New York), 'Antiquarians Mediating Histories: Walter Scott’s The Antiquary and the Historical Novel', and Natasha Tessone (Oberlin), 'Tending to the (National) Household: Good vs. Bad Economy in Walter Scott’s The Antiquary'. The conference also featured six further papers on Scott: Laila Ferreira (British Columbia), 'Sensory Stimulation and Literary Spectacle: Sir Walter Scott’s Mediations in the Keepsake', Ina Ferris (Ottawa), 'Mediating Letters and Learning: Walter Scott’s Bookish Authorship', Nancy Goslee (Tennessee Knoxville), 'Three Nations, Two Eras, One Union?: History as Revenant in Scott's Rokeby', Peter Manning and Susan Scheckel (Stonybrook), 'Troubling Boundaries: Scott, Whitman, and National Poetry', Lauren Schachter (British Columbia), '"Replanted figures, transmuted things": Scott’s "living antiques"', and Paul Westover (Brigham Young), 'Walter Scott, Illustration Books, and the Literary Tourist Industry'. For further information see the conference site and programme.

29) ESSE 10: 10th International Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, University of Turin, Italy, 24-28 August 2010

The 10th biennial International Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, hosted by the University of Turin, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Kailyard Money: The Local and the Global in Scott’s Malachi Malagrowther Letters' by Liam Connell (Winchester). For further information, see the conference site and list of papers.

30) 'Scott and Byron', Lecture by Allan Massie, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 16 September 2010

Allan Massie is the author of over twenty novels, including The Ragged Lion (1994), a fictionalized biography of Scott, which he has also adapted for the stage as The Minstrel and the Shirra. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

31) 'The Essential Eighteenth Century', Annual Meeting of the Midwestern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Wichita, Kansas, 30 September-3 October 2010

The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Midwestern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (MWASECS) featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Folk Infatuations: Ballads in Scott's Waverley' by Ruth Knezevich, a graduate student at the University of Missouri. For further information, see conference site and programme.

32) 'Charting the 18th Century: Encircling Land & Sea', 36th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies', Memorial University of Newfoundland, 14-16 October 2010

The 36th Annual Conference of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, hosted by Memorial University of Newfoundland, included a panel on 'Scott and Historical Fiction', featuring the following papers: Martha F. Bowden (Kennesaw State), 'The Progress of Romance: Historical Fiction’s Rewriting of the History of the Novel', Kathleen James-Cavan (Saskatchewan), 'Beyond David Ritchie: Authority and the Dwarf in Walter Scott’s The Black Dwarf', and David E. A. Ritter (Toronto), 'Genre and Historical Representation in The Bride of Lammermoor'. Further information from the conference site and programme.

33) NEASECS 2010, Annual Meeting of the Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, 21-23 October 2010

The Annual Meeting of the Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, co-hosted by Buffalo State College and the University at Buffalo (both institutions of the State University of New York), featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Throwing History out of Court: Walter Scott, Historiography, and the Law of Conspiracy' by Mike Goode (Syracuse). Prof. Goode is the author of Sentimental Masculinity and the Rise of History, 1790-1890 (Cambridge University Press, 2009), which includes three chapters on Scott (see Goode 2009a, Goode 2009b, and Goode 2009c). Further information from the conference site and programme.

34) Abbotsford, Strawberry Hill or Conundrum Castle?', Annual John Murray Archive Lecture by Sir Eric Anderson, National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, 26 October 2010

The Annual John Murray Archive Lecture is jointly hosted by the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society and the National Library of Scotland. This year it was delivered by Sir Eric Anderson, editor of The Journal of Sir Walter Scott (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972) and former Provost of Eton College.

35) 'Scott's Lighthouse Tour', Lecture by Dr Penny Fielding, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 4 November 2010

Dr Fielding (Edinburgh University) has edited The Monastery (2000) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels and is the author of Writing and Orality: Nationality, Culture and Nineteenth-Century Scottish Fiction (Oxford University Press, 1996) and Scotland and the Fictions of Geography: North Britain 1760-1830 (Cambridge University Press, 2009). Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

36) 2010 PAMLA Conference, Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii, 13-14 November 2010

The 108th annual conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA), was held at Chaminade University, Honolulu, and co-sponsored by University of Hawaii, West Oahu, and Scripps College. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"No Man of Flesh and Blood": Ivanhoe’s Locksley and the Ballad Tradition' by Ruth Baldwin (California, Berkeley), which explored Scott’s use of the ballad tradition in his characterization of Locksley, the Robin Hood figure of Ivanhoe. For further information, see the conference site and programme.

37) 'Abbotsford Revisited: A Dramatised Reading', The Mercators, Abbotsford House, 3 December 2010

Following its successful run at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the Mercators theatre group presented Abbotsford Revisited, a dramatised reading based on Scott's life, times, and works, devised by Alan Richardson.

38) 'What Does Walter Scott Mean to Scotland?', Panel Discussion, The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, 8 December 2010

As part of a series of events around the exhibition Rebels with a Cause: The Jacobites and the Global Imagination (The Scottish Parliament, 27 October 2010-8 January 2011), Magnus Linklater chaired a panel of experts, including Stuart Kelly, author of Scott-Land: The Man Who Invented a Nation, who discussed Scott’s legacy. More information here.

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2009

1) 'Stendhal et les Romantismes: l'Europe romantique de Stendhal', International Conference, Centre d’études stendhaliennes et romantiques (CESR), Université Stendhal-Grenoble 3, France, 28-30 January 2009

This international conference on Stendhal and European Romanticism, organized by the Centre d’études stendhaliennes et romantiques (CESR), included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Notre père Walter Scott: Stendhal, Walter Scott et la stratégie romanticiste' by Xavier Bourdenet (IUFM Paris). Click here for the conference programme.

2) 'Walter Scott und seine Deutschliebe', Talk by Prof. Kenneth S. Whitton, Leeds Anglo German Club, 3 February 2009

Prof. Whitton's talk to Leeds Anglo German Club discussed links between Scott and German writers and musicians, including Goethe and Schubert. Kenneth S. Whitton is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Languages & European Studies at the University of Bradford. He is author of Goethe and Schubert: The Unseen Bond (Portland, Ore.: Amadeus Press, 1999).

3) Dickens Project Winter Conference, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 21 February 2009

This graduate conference, sponsored by the Dickens Project and hosted by Vanderbilt University featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Education, Quotation, and Waverley’s Roynish Clown' by Matthew Fellion (St. Francis Xavier).

4) 'From Sir Walter Scott to Osama Bin Laden: Ideas of Crusading over Recent Centuries', Lecture by Prof. Jonathan Phillips, Guildford Museum, Guildford, Surrey, 26 February 2009

Part of an annual series of talks hosted by Guildford Museum, this lecture examined how and why westerners have continued to employ the word and concept of crusading into modern times. It covered the French invasion of Algeria, the Spanish Civil War and the aftermath of 9/11, and revealed how Saladin (featured in Scott's The Talisman) has been used in a modern context by some Islamic leaders. Jonathan Phillips is Professor of Crusading History at Royal Holloway, University of London. Click here for further details.

5) 'The Corson Collection: Edinburgh University Library's Scott Monument', Seminar by Dr Paul Barnaby, Edinburgh Book History Seminar, 13 March 2009

The Edinburgh Book History Seminars are organized by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of Book and take place on Fridays (1300-1400) in the newly opened Centre for Research Collections, Edinburgh University Main Library. Dr Barnaby (Edinburgh University Library) is editor of this website and has published articles on the reception and translation of Scottish literature. His talk provided an introduction to Edinburgh University Library's major Corson Collection of Walter Scott material.

6) 'Cultures across Borders: Negotiating the Global and the Local', Coordinates of Comparison 2009, 3rd Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference, University of Alberta, 13-14 March 2009

The 3rd Annual Comparative Literature Graduate Conference ('Coordinates of Comparison') hosted by the University of Alberta Comparative Literature Program featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Narrative Verse and Romantic Revolutions: Walter Scott's The Lay of the Last Minstrel' by David Buchanan (Alberta).

7) 'From Walter Scott’s Marmion to William Gell’s Morea: Some Lessons in Topography and Topology for Contemporary Reconstructions of Antiquity', Lecture by Michael Shanks, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University, March 17, 2009

This lecture on Scott's Marmion was one of the 2008/2009 Series of Lectures and Workshops held by the Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University (Providence RI). Michael Shanks is the Omar and Althea Dwyer Hoskins Professor of Classical Archaeology at Stanford University. He is currently working on Borderlands: Tyne to Tweed, a volume charting the regional archaeology of the Roman north as chorography.

8) 40th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Richmond Marriott, Richmond, VA, 26-29 March 2009

The 40th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), held in the Richmond Marriott, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Empty Space and British Paranoia in Scott’s The Antiquary' by Anna Dodson (Rice University). Click here for the conference site and programme.

9) British Society for Literature and Science 2009 Conference, University of Reading, 27-29 March 2009

The 2009 Conference of The British Society for Literature and Science included a paper by Adelene Buckland (Cambridge): '"High Jinks": Walter Scott and the Culture of Nineteenth-Century Geology'. Dr Buckland is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow for the Cambridge Victorian Studies Group. Click here for the conference programme.

10) 'Cross-Currents', 9th Irish and Scottish Studies Postgraduate Conference, University of Aberdeen, 3-5 April 2009

Hosted by the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, this three-day conference included a session on Scott, featuring three papers: Ainsley McIntosh (Aberdeen): '"Alive within the Tomb": Narrative Closure, Enclosure and Disclosure in Marmion', Anna Fancett (Aberdeen): 'Narrative Outcasts: The Discourse of the Powerless', and Kang-yen Chiu (Glasgow), 'Orientalism, Hospitality and Empire in The Talisman'. Click here for the conference programme.

11) The Classical Association Annual Conference 2009, University of Glasgow, 3-6 April 2009

The 2009 annual meeting of the Classical Association was held jointly with the Classical Association of Scotland and hosted by the Department of Classics, University of Glasgow. It included a paper by Dr Chris Ann Matteo (Virginia): 'Spolia from Troy: Classical Epic Allusion in Walter Scott’s Waverley'. Click here for the conference programme.

12) 'Romantic Visual Cultures', One-Day International Conference, University of Cardiff, 17 April 2009

Hosted by the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR), University of Cardiff, this conference focussed on various aspects of the visual imagination, fine arts and aesthetics, and the complex relationships between them during the Romantic period. The plenary speakers included Peter Garside (Edinburgh) who spoke on ‘Hogg, Scott, and Visual Representations of Literary Friendship’. Peter Garside is Professor of Bibliography and Textual Studies at the University of Edinburgh and was the founding Chair of the Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. Among many Scott-related publications, he has edited The Black Dwarf (1993), Guy Mannering (1999), and Waverley (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and The Visionary for University College Cardiff Press (1984). Prof. Garside recently directed the project Illustrating Scott: A Database of Printed Illustrations to the Waverley Novels, 1814-1901. Click here for the conference site.

13) Meeting of the Johnson Society of the Central Region, Chicago, Illinois, 17-18 April 2009

At a meeting to mark the tercentenary of Samuel Johnson's birth, Martha F. Bowden (Kennesaw State) presented a paper entitled 'Writing a Chapter in Literary History: Scott's Continuing Influence on Historical Fiction' (information from The Eighteenth-Century Intelligencer, September 2009).

14) 'E os gaiteiros de saiote?: reflexões sobre a identidade nacional na literatura escocesa', Lecture by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques, Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, Brazil, 23 April 2009

Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques, lecturer in Comparative Literature at the Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, discussed the linguistic, social, and aspects of Scottish national identity as expressed in Scottish literature with particular reference to Sir Walter Scott. Click here for more information (in Portuguese) and here for a list of Dr Henrique's recent Scott-related publications.

15) 'Rejecting England: Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe’s Rebecca and George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda', Seminar by Dr John Docker, Department of History, University of Sydney, 27 April 2009

This talk by Dr Docker (Australian National University) was part of a seminar series for postgraduates and faculty held by the Department of History, University of Sydney. Dr Docker is author of 1492: The Poetics of Diaspora (London; New York, 2001) and (with Ann Curthoys) Is History Fiction? (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005). Click here for further details.

16) 'Romantic Translation, 1780-1830', One-Day Conference, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, 12 May 2009

This conference, organised by Edinburgh University's Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, included a paper by Dr Paul Barnaby (Edinburgh University Library), 'Translation and the Romantic Right: A.J.B. Defauconpret and the Waverley Novels', focussing on political manipulation in translations of Old Mortality and Rob Roy. Dr Barnaby is editor of this website and has published articles on the translation and reception of Scottish writing in Europe. Click here for further details of the programme.

17) 'Abbotsford: Past, Present, and Future', Address by Jacquie Wright, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 14 May 2009

Jacquie Wright is Executive Manager of Abbotsford House, Scott's 'plaything in stone' (see Homes). Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

18) 'Migrating Minds: Imagined Journeys - Imagined Homecomings', Two-Day Conference, University of Aberdeen, 14-15 May 2009

Hosted by the AHRC Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, this conference sought to investigate the idea of migration as a series of narratives and rhetorical tropes that develop over time. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Imagining India in the Waverley Novels’ by Sally Newsome (Aberdeen). Click here for the conference site.

19) 'From Waverley to Waverley Station: Wordsworth's Influential Friend Scott', Talk by Sir Eric Anderson, KT, Wordsworth Museum & Art Gallery, Grasmere, Cumbria, 16 May 2009

'From Waverley to Waverley Station' was one of the 2009 series of Bindman Talks providing a general introduction to some of the authors and works in the Wordsworth Trust's collection. It explored Scott's legacy - how he made novels popular and affordable, encouraged a love of romantic highland scenery in his readers, invented Scottish baronial architecture, established tartan as Scotland's national dress, and even had a railway station named after his most famous novel. Sir Eric Anderson, KT, recently retired Provost of Eton College, is editor of The Journal of Sir Walter Scott (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972). Click here for further details.

20) 'Romanticism and Modernity', 17th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, Duke University, 21-24 May 2009

The 17th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), held at Duke University (Durham, NC), explored continuities and/or points of contact between the relatively compact period of Romanticism and the social, political, economic, and aesthetic formations of European modernity that either precede it or that follow in Romanticism’s wake. Focussing on Romanticism’s complex and often ambivalent place within the material processes and intellectual genealogies of European modernity, it aimed to encourage work that linked British Romantic Studies to a wider European context. It featured four papers of particular Scott interest: Alexander Dick (British Columbia), 'Scott’s Late Style', Christopher Scalia ( University of Virginia's College at Wise), '"Long Live the Swinish Multitudes!": Edmund Burke & the Rhetoric of Scott’s The Letters of Malachi Malagrowther', Jeffrey Scraba (Memphis), 'Remembrance and Reconstruction: Walter Scott’s Antiquaries', and Keya Kraft (Washington), '"Romance of a House": Scott, Abbotsford, and the Invention of the Medieval'. See the conference site and programme.

21) 'Interrogation Techniques: Law, Texts, Culture', English Graduate Conference, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, 29-30 May 2009

This interdisciplinary conference, hosted by the graduate students of Simon Fraser University's English Department, sought to question the role of law in literary and cultural production and its manifestations in texts and as texts, featuring scholarly, creative and round-table presentations. It included one paper of particular Scott interest. In '"The Good Old Rule": Law and Lawlessness in Sir Walter Scott’s Rob Roy', Dr David Chant (Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario) explored how law is perceived, constructed and enforced in the various regional settings (London, Northumberland, Glasgow and the Scottish Highlands) in which Rob Roy is set. More information from the conference site.

22) 'Long Live the Swinish Multitude!', Lecture by Christopher Scalia, University of Virginia's College at Wise, 30 May, 2009

Christopher Scalia, assistant professor of English at The University of Virginia’s College at Wise, analysed the rhetoric of Scott’s Letters of Malachi Malagrowther, showing how Scott modified the language of Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) to defend a distinctively Scottish way of life. Click here for more information.

23) 'Scott as Poet, Critic, and Historian', Address by Dr Ronald A. Silvester, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 4 June 2009

Dr Ronald A. Silvester is a member of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club who has previously delivered the lecture 'The Wizard of the North: Confounding the Detractors' (4 June 2004). Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

24) 'Durability and Transience: Cultural Borders of Temporality', 11th Annual Conference of the English Department of Bucharest University, Romania, 3-5 June 2010

The 11th Annual Conference of the English Department of Bucharest University featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Minstrels and Old Singing Women: The Durability and Transience of Ballads for Walter Scott and his Contemporaries' by James Brown (Bucharest). Click here for a full programme.

25) 'Du livre à l'auteur: autorité, sociabilités, matérialité et circulation de l’écrit du XVIe au XIXe siècle', One-Day Workshop, Université Paris Ouest-Nanterre, France, 15 June 2009

This workshop, organized by the research group 'Livre: Création, Culture et Société' (Centre d'histoire culturelle des sociétés contemporaines, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines) in collaboration with Mediadix (Pôle Métiers du Livre, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense), featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Péritexte éditorial et préfaciel: le jeu avec la figure de l’auteur au seuil des romans de Walter Scott publiés en Grande-Bretagne et en France (1814-1824)' by Caroline Raulet-Marcel (Université Paris 7).

26) International Conference on Minds and Narrative, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium, 16-18 June 2009

Organized by the FWO Research Community OLITH, this conference at the Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, aimed to broach theoretical and methodological issues concerning recent developments in the study of minds and narrative fiction and to offer a forum for discussion between the empirical, narratological and hermeneutic traditions in the field. Of particular Scott interest was an address by keynote speaker Alan Palmer: 'Social Minds in some Nineteenth-Century Novels' which focussed on Scott’s Waverley and Joseph Conrad’s The Nigger of the ‘Narcissus’. Palmer, an independent scholar living in London, is author of Fictional Minds (Lincoln, Neb.: University of Nebraska Press, 2004). More information from the conference site.

27) 'Scènes de savoir dans la littérature du dix-neuvième siècle/Scenes of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Image', International Conference, Université Paris-Diderot, France, 18-19 June 2009

This conference, organized by the research group LARCA (Laboratoire de Recherche sur les Cultures Anglophones EA 4214) at the Université Paris-Diderot, featured on paper of particular Scott interest: 'Scenes of 'Other' Knowledge: The Encounter with Gypsies in Scott's Guy Mannering' by Josephine McDonagh (King's College, London).

28) 'Romantic Disorder: Predisciplinarity and the Divisions of Knowledge 1750-1850', Three-Day Conference, Birkbeck, University of London, 18-20 June 2009

Hosted by the Institute of English Studies, University of London, and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, Birkbeck, University of London, with the support of the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies, Birkbeck, this conference explored the fluid and unfamiliar contours of predisciplinarity/adisciplinarity in an expansive Romantic Century, 1750-1850. It presented an opportunity to defamiliarize foundational moments, master narratives, and key figures of the Romantic century, by opening them up to predisciplinary and eccentric objects, encounters, and texts. Together with many other papers of Scott interest, it included one paper specifically devoted to Scott: ‘Scott and the Geologists’ by Dr Adelene Buckland (Cambridge Victorian Studies Group). More information from the conference site.

29) 'A Colloquium on Rob Roy' with Prof. David Hewitt and Alasdair Hutton, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 20 June 2009

Professor Hewitt is editor-in-chief of the recently completed Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (EEWN) and Co-Director of the Walter Scott Research Centre. In addition to publishing many important articles on Scott, he has edited Scott on Himself: A Selection of the Autobiographical Writings of Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1981) and Scott and His Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen: Association for Scottish Literary Studies, c1983) (with J. H. Alexander). For the EEWN, he has edited The Antiquary (1995), Redgauntlet (with G. A. M. Wood, 1996), The Heart of Mid-Lothian (with Alison Lumsden, 2004), and, most recently, Rob Roy (2008). Alasdair H. Hutton O.B.E., T.D., is Convener of the Scottish Borders Council and a former Conservative MEP for the South of Scotland constituency. He is a writer and presenter of public events including the Edinburgh Military Tattoo, and has provided the narrative voice-over for a wide variety of video and audio presentations including for Edinburgh Castle.

30) 'Tradition and Innovation: The State of Book History = Le Point sur l'Histoire du livre', SHARP 2009, University of Toronto, 23-27 June 2009

The 17th annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, held at the University of Toronto, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Transnational Approaches to Book History: Scott’s The Heart of Mid-Lothian' by David Buchanan (Alberta).

31) 'Past versus Present', BAVS/NAVSA Joint Conference, Churchill College, Cambridge University, 13-15 July 2009

The first ever joint meeting of the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS) and the North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA) was hosted by the Cambridge Victorian Studies Group. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Tractarian Interpretation of Sir Walter Scott' by Diana Powell (Liverpool). Further details from the conference site.

32) 'Narrative Dominions: On Writing the History of the Novel in English', Three-Day Conference, Institute of English Studies, University of London, 20-22 July 2009

Hosted by the Institute of English Studies, University in London in association with the Centre for the History of Authorship, Writing and Publishing, University of Reading, this conference addressed the shifting terrains and overlapping dominions of English-language prose fiction from its origins to the present day, bringing together aesthetic, generic, geographical, material, socio-political, and theoretical aspects of literary history. It was linked to the forthcoming multi-volume Oxford History of the Novel in English, to be published by Oxford University Press from 2010 onwards. Of particular Scott interest was 'Illustrating Scott: Printed Illustrations to the Waverley novels, 1814-1901', a paper by Peter Garside (Edinburgh). Click here for the conference site.

33) 'Romantic Circulations', 11th Biennial International Conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies, Roehampton University, London, 23-26 July 2009

The biennial conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS), hosted by the Centre for Research in Romanticism, Roehampton University, aimed to investigate the transmission of Romantic ideas, knowledge, cultural forms and literary discourses in the context of changing relations between artist and audience, writer and reader, producer and consumer, elite and popular, national and trans-national. A panel 'Fictions of Walter Scott' included three papers of particular Scott interest: Daniel Cook (Cambridge), 'The circulation of life: Walter Scott on Jonathan Swift', Caroline M. Jackson-Houlston (Oxford Brookes), '"A Dingy or Damaged Commodity": Circulation, Honour and Commodification in Scott’s Saint Ronan’s Well', and Sally Elizabeth Newsome (Aberdeen), '"Handkerchiefs into Turbans" and "Petticoats into Pantaloons": Walter Scott, Saint Ronan’s Well, and the Transmission of the Oriental’. Further details from the conference site.

34) ‘Collectors, Librarians and the Book Trade’, 27th Print Networks Conference, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 28-30 July 2009

The 27th conference in the series of British Book Trade Seminars, supported by the Bibliographical Society, and held at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, featured one paper of Scott interest: ‘Was Sir Walter Scott a Bibliomaniac?’ by Lindsay Levy. Lindsay Levy, Rare Books Cataloguer for the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, is preparing a searchable catalogue of Sir Walter Scott's Library at Abbotsford as part of the Abbotsford Library Research Project.

35) 'Sir Walter Scott and the Covenanters', One-Day Course, Office of Lifelong Learning, University of Edinburgh, 14 August 2009

This course, organized by Edinburgh University's Office of Lifelong Learning, tested the claim that Scott's works display an extensive knowledge of historical sources, a strong sense of place, a wide social vision, and an ability to present both sides of a contentious issue. Tutor Dr John Milne focussed on Old Mortality with briefer reference to The Heart of Mid-Lothian. Click here for further details.

36) 'Exil et retour: contextes et comparaisons/Exile and Return: Context and Comparisons', Annual Conference of the Société Française d’Études Écossaises, University of St Andrews, 10-12 September 2009

The annual conference of the Société Française d’Études Écossaises (French Society for Scottish Studies), held in conjunction with the Universities of St Andrews and Strathclyde, explored the theme of exile and return, building on a growing corpus of scholarship concerning migration, emigration and the formation of Scottish expatriate communities abroad. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Homecoming and Liminality in Walter Scott's Guy Mannering' by Céline Sabiron (Sorbonne-Paris IV). A print version of this paper has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings which were published in Études écossaises, 13 (2010). Click here for the conference site.

37) The Ragged Lion, Rowan Tree Theatre Company, Scottish Tour, 19 September-25 October 2009

For their 2009 tour, the Rowan Tree Theatre Company performed The Ragged Lion, a dramatic adaptation of Allan Massie's 1994 novel. The play presents Scott in the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis of 1825-26. In the solitude of his study, facing a lifetime of toil to repay his debts, he wrestles with the ghosts and demons of his and his country’s past. Click here for further information and here for the tour schedule. The Rowan Tree Theatre Company previously toured with a production of The Journey of Jeannie Deans (2007), an adaptation of Scott's The Heart of Mid-Lothian by Judy Steel.

38) 4th International Association of Adaptation Studies Conference, British Film Institute, London, 24-25 September 2009

The 4th annual International Conference of the Association of Adaptation Studies, hosted by the British Film Institute, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Ivanhoe and Kidnapped: The Aesthetics of the Classic Adventure Serial' by Richard Butt (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh). Click here for the conference programme.

39) Clan Scott Gathering 2009, Bowhill, Scottish Borders, 24-27 September 2009

As part of the Homecoming Scotland 2009 celebrations, the Chief of Clan Scott, the Duke of Buccleuch, hosted the first gathering of Clan Scott Societies at his ancestral home of Bowhill in the Scottish Borders. Events included a historical re-enactment of the Carterhaugh Ba' Game, displays of archery and horsemanship, and a performance by the Rowan Tree Theatre Company of The Minstrel and the Shirra, a play about Sir Walter Scott by Allan Massie (adapted from his novel The Ragged Lion). Click here for a programme of events and here for further information.

40) 'Romanistik: Beruf und Berufung', XXXI. Romanistentag, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany, 27 September-1 October 2009

The 31st annual meeting of the Deutscher Romanistenverband, held at Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Die Promessi sposi von Alessandro Manzoni: Parallelen und Differenzen zu anderen europäischen Romanen zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts' by Johanna Hellermann (Bonn/Florenz), which investigated parallels and differences between Manzoni's masterpiece and other early nineteenth-century novels, notably the work of Scott. Click here for the conference programme.

41) ‘Ivanhoe and Kidnapped: The Aesthetics of the Classic Adventure Serial’, Seminar by Dr Richard Butt, Centre for Screen Studies, University of Glasgow, 7 October 2009

In this research seminar, organized by Glasgow University's Centre for Screen Studies, Dr Richard Butt (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh) looked at television adaptations of Scott's Ivanhoe and Stevenson's Kidnapped.

42) 'Walter Scott: Bibliophile or Bibliomaniac?', Address by Lindsay Levy, Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, 8 October 2009

Lindsay Levy, Rare Books Cataloguer for the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh, is preparing a searchable catalogue of Sir Walter Scott's Library at Abbotsford as part of the Abbotsford Library Research Project. This event was co-hosted by the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club and the Department of English Literature, University of Edinburgh, and was open to the public. Details from Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

43) 'Reworking the Regency', Three-Day Conference, University of Melbourne, 8-10 October 2009

Co-hosted by the University of Melbourne and the Research School of Humanities of the Australian National University, this interdisciplinary conference explored new perspectives on the political, literary and public culture of Britain during the Regency (1811-20) and subsequent reign (1821-30) of George IV. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Celebrity and Debt in the Journal of Sir Walter Scott 1825-1832' by Melinda Graefe, a postgraduate student at Flinders University. For further information see the conference site and programme.

44) 'Victorian Markets and Marketing', Joint Conference of the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada and Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States, Emily Carr University of Art and Design/University of the Fraser Valley, Vancouver, BC, 15-17 October 2009

This joint conference of the Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada and Victorian Interdisciplinary Studies Association of the Western United States, hosted by Emily Carr University of Art and Design and the University of the Fraser Valley, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Picturing Scotland through the Waverley Novels: Walter Scott and the Origins of the Victorian Illustrated Novel' by Richard Hill (Hawaii). While working for his Ph.D. thesis on Scott's illustrators, Dr Hill worked on this website and on the Image Collection. For further information see the conference site and programme.

45) 'Sir Walter Scott, Money, and the Credit Crunch of 1825', Lecture by Prof. Sam McKinstry, University of the West of Scotland, 21 October 2009

Part of the Inspiring People Lecture Series held by the University of the West of Scotland, this lecture by Sam McKinstry (UWS Business School) set Scott’s literary works in the context of the Industrial Revolution and related their production to Scott’s cash flow requirements for building Abbotsford as well as to his business involvements. It drew parallels between the financial crisis of 1825-26 and today's 'credit crunch' and re-examined the allegation that Scott was financially careless and wrote mainly for money rather than for artistic reasons. Click here for further details. See McKinstry 2011 for an article on Scott and the Crash of 1825-26.

46) 'Scottish Gothic, 1764–Present', One-Day Symposium, University of Stirling, 24 October 2009

Scottish culture and the Gothic have interacted fruitfully with one another ever since the rise of this literary mode during the late eighteenth century. Writers and thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment such as David Hume, Adam Smith, Henry Mackenzie, James Thomson and James Macpherson were crucial to the discursive foundations of the Gothic aesthetic, while, during the 1790s and early 1800s, Scottish histories and landscapes, however highly mythologised, served as the setting for numerous Gothic romances written and published throughout the British isles. In the first few decades of the nineteenth century, Scottish writers such as James Hogg and Walter Scott interacted with, and modified, Gothic conventions in intriguing and innovative ways, and in the latter part of the century, Robert Louis Stevenson would write and publish what has subsequently become an iconic Gothic text of the fin de siècle. In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, manifestations of Gothic convention in Scottish literature are no less profound, and contemporary Scottish writers such as Alasdair Gray, Irvine Welsh, Iain Banks and Louise Welsh continue to employ aspects of the Gothic in their work. But these are only some of the best-known names in a rich tradition of Scottish Gothic that stretches back to the latter half of the eighteenth century. Aiming to move beyond a mere consideration of the Gothic in fictions by writers of Scottish nationality, this conference, hosted by the Department of English Studies at Stirling University, featured papers that explored the use of Gothic conventions in texts about Scotland, its histories and its landscapes, irrespective of their particular cultural provenance. Of particular Scott interest was a plenary lecture by Peter Garside (Edinburgh): 'Uncovering Scottish (Gothic) Fiction 1771-1836'. For further information, see the conference programme.

47) 'The Idea of Europe: Memories and Postcolonial Europe', Two-Day Conference, Utrecht University, Netherlands, 29-30 October 2009

This conference, organized by the ENACT Symposium at Utrecht University featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Beyond the Textual Line: Walter Scott’s Postponing and Post-Scripting of Authentic Scottishness' by Margret Fetzer (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich). For further information, see the conference programme. An expanded version of Prof. Fetzer's paper has subsequently been published in Moving Worlds, 11.2 (2011),.

48) 'Romanticism and the City', 16th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, City College and the Graduate Centre of the City University of New York, 5-8 November 2009

The 16th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism (ICR) was jointly hosted by City College and the Graduate Center of City University of New York. From Wordsworth’s description of Lyrical Ballads as a response to 'the increasing accumulation of men in cities' to Baudelaire’s location of the impetus for his prose poetry in 'la fréquentation des villes énormes'. the history of Romanticism is bound up with a continuous and evolving response to the emergence of the modern city. As work in a range of areas in our own day leads us to reconsider how we think about such oppositions as nature and culture, the organic and the mechanical, wholeness and multiplicity, the urban text or sub-text of Romanticism presents itself not only as a comparatively neglected area of investigation but as a place to pursue this rethinking. Of particular Scott interest was the President's Address by Nancy Goslee (Tennessee-Knoxville): 'Scott's Rhyming Reconsidered: Nationalisms, Romanticisms, and (Maybe) Aesthetics'. Prof. Goslee is author of Scott the Rhymer (University Press of Kentucky, 1988) and numerous articles on Scott. For more information, see the conference site and programme.

49) '1759: Making and Unmaking Empires', Joint Conference of the Canadian and Northeastern American Societies for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of Ottawa, 5-8 November 2009

This joint conference of the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and Northeastern American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, hosted by the University of Ottawa, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Portraying the Alterity of the Past: Scott’s Use of Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Art Criticism in Waverley' by Emma Peacocke (Carleton) and 'Representing History in a Post-Revolutionary Age: Jane Porter and Historical Fiction before Walter Scott' by Morgan Rooney (Ottawa). For further information, see the conference site and programme.

50) 'Illustrating the Waverley Novels: Scott, Scotland, and the London Print Trade, 1819-36', Seminar by Prof. Peter Garside, Edinburgh Book History Seminar, 20 November 2009

The Edinburgh Book History Seminars are organized by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of Book and take place on Fridays (1300-1400) in the newly opened Centre for Research Collections, Edinburgh University Main Library. Peter Garside is Professor of Bibliography and Textual Studies at the University of Edinburgh and was the founding Chair of the Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. Among many Scott-related publications, he has edited The Black Dwarf (1993), Guy Mannering (1999), and Waverley (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and The Visionary for University College Cardiff Press (1984). He was Project Director of the recently completed Illustrating Scott: A Database of Printed Illustrations to the Waverley Novels, 1814-1901. Click here for the Autumn 2009 schedule of Edinburgh Book History Seminars.

51) Scott's Selkirk, Selkirk, Scottish Borders, 5-6 December 2009

Scott’s Selkirk was a Millennium project that proved so popular that it has become an established part of the Selkirk calendar. For the first weekend in December, the town centre reverts to Scott's day, with most shopkeepers dressing themselves and their windows appropriately. Scott's era is recalled with costume drama (in Sir Walter Scott's Courtroom), street entertainment, craft stalls, historical re-enactments, music and more. The weekend's events are sponsored by local shops and businesses. Contact 01750 22217 for more information.

52) 'The Shadow of the Precursor', A Conference on Influence and Intertextuality, Penneshaw, Kangaroo Island, South Australia, 7-9 December 2009

Supported by the Flinders Humanities Research Centre for Cultural Heritage and Cultural Exchange, this conference featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"For Fiction - Read Scott Alone": The Legacy of Sir Walter Scott on Youthful writers' by Christine Alexander (New South Wales). An expanded version of Prof. Alexander's paper has subsequently been published in the conference proceedings (Cambridge Scholars, 2012).

53) 'MLA 2009', 125th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, 27-30 December 2009

The 125th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association featured four papers of particular Scott interest: Richard Hill (Maui Community College, Hawaii), 'Scott and the Scottish Race: William Allan and the Ethnographical Construction of Scotland through the Waverley Illustrations', Suha Kudsieh (Trent), 'Orientals and Indians in Sir Walter Scott’s The Talisman and "The Surgeon’s Daughter"', Susan Oliver (Salford), '"A Feather in Our Cap": Scott, Murray, and the Founding of the Quarterly Review', and Takayuki Yokota-Murakami (Osaka), 'The Creation of a Lady (Kajin) as a Modern Gendered Subjectivity: Sexual Politics in the Japanese Translations of Walter Scott and Charlotte Brontë'. For further information, see the conference site.

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2008

1) 'Reinventing the Self' : South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 2008 Conference, 21-23 February 2008, Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, LA

Amongst other items of Scott interest, the 2008 Conference of the South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies included a paper by Colin Marlaire (National University) entitled 'Encoding Dissent: Sensationalizing the Commonplace in the Novels of Sir Walter Scott'. Click here for the conference programme.

2) 'Reading the Past in the Nineteenth Century', Symposium, King's College, Cambridge, 4 March 2008

Jointly hosted by the Cambridge Victorian Studies Group and the ‘The Reading Experience Database 1450-1945' (RED), this symposium included a paper by Annika Bautz (Zurich) on 'Scott’s Victorian Readers', showing how sales figures and other data demonstrated the persistent popularity of Scott’s novels over the course of the nineteenth century. Dr Bautz has recently published The Reception of Jane Austen and Walter Scott: A Comparative Longitudinal Study (London; New York: Continuum, 2007) and contributed a chapter to The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe (Continuum, 2006). A second paper by Rosemary Mitchell (Leeds) entitled 'Charlotte M. Yonge: Reading, Writing, and Recycling Historical Fiction in the Nineteenth Century' charted the presence of Scott's The Talisman as a subtly pervasive intertext in Yonge’s own Chantry House (1886). Click here for further details and here for a review of the symposium.(Expanded versions of the papers by Bautz and Mitchell have subsequently appeared in a special issue of Nineteenth-Century Contexts, 31.1 (2009).)

3) '(Trans)national Identities/Reimagining Communities', Joint Conference of the Centro Interdisciplinare di Studi Romantici and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, University of Bologna, Italy, 12-15 March 2008

Jointly hosted by the University of Bologna's Centro Interdisciplinare di Studi Romantici and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), this conference invited papers that took up the construction and dissolution of national identities both positively, in terms of new forms of internationalism and cultural exchange; and more problematically, for example through war, or through forms of (non)identity or (non)community that elude utopian collectivizations. Although many papers touched upon Scott, only one was entirely devoted to his work: 'Waverley, or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since' by Franca Ruggieri (Rome III), author of Walter Scott in Italia, 1821-1971 (Bari: Adriatica, 1975). A session on the Continuum series The Reception of British and Irish Romantic Authors in Europe included a presentation of The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray G. H. Pittock (2006). Click here for the conference site.

4) 'Editing Across the Disciplines', Society for Textual Scholarship 2008 Conference, Boston Editorial Institute, Boston, MA, 13-15 March 2008

Amongst other items of Scott interest, the 2008 Conference of the Society for Textual Scholarship, held at Boston Editorial Institute, included a paper by Richard Hill (University of Hawaii) entitled 'The Illustrated Contributions of Sir Walter Scott and James Hogg to Gift-Books and Annuals of the 1820s and 1830s’. While working for his Ph.D. thesis on Scott's illustrators, Dr Hill worked on this website and on the Image Collection. Click here for the conference programme.

5) 'Publishing Abbotsford: Walter Scott's Literary Legacy and the Abbotsford Edition of the Waverley Novels (1842-7)', Talk by Ruth M. McAdams, Edinburgh Book History Seminar, 14 March 2008

The Edinburgh Book History Seminars are organized by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of Book. Ruth McAdams (University of Edinburgh) works as a research associate on Illustrating Scott, a project to locate and catalogue all illustrations to the Waverley Novels that appeared in print form in Britain between the publication of Waverley (1814) and the end of the nineteenth century. A print version of this talk has subsequently appeared in Journal of the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society, 3 (2008). 

6) 'Scottish Imprints from Sir Walter Scott's Library', Exhibition, Abbotsford House, Melrose, 17 March-31 October 2008

The Faculty of Advocates, owners of Sir Walter Scott’s library at Abbotsford, mounted a series of small exhibitions at Abbotsford during 2008 featuring rare and early Scottish imprints from Scott's own collection. Click here for further information.

7) 'Revaluing Walter Scott', Lecture by Professor Douglas Gifford, The National Trust for Scotland, Bearsden & Milngavie Members' Centre, Milngavie Town Hall, Glasgow, 20 March 2008

Professor Douglas Gifford is Emeritus Professor of Scottish Literature at the University of Glasgow and is the Honorary Librarian of Scott’s Library at Abbotsford. He is Director of the Abbotsford Library Research Project Trust, a joint venture of The Advocate's Library in Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, which is stock-checking Scott's Library, publishing unpublished material, and undertaking further research into Scott's book collection.

8) 39th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Hilton Portland and Executive Tower, Portland, OR, 27-30 March 2008

The 39th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), held in the Hilton Portland and Executive Tower, featured three papers of particular Scott interest: Raymond Grant (University of Alberta, Edmonton), 'Robert Burns and Walter Scott: The Republicans and the Democrats in Embryo', Anne Simonin (CNRS-Maison Française d’Oxford), 'The Case of Infanticide: Scott’s Heart of Midlothian', and Matthew Wickman (Brigham Young University), 'Alba Newton; or, After Euclid, before Scott'. For further information, see the conference site and programme.

9) 'Perceptions of Crusading History from Sir Walter Scott to Osama bin Laden', Lecture by Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith, University of Leicester, 21 April 2008

In a 50th Anniversary lecture at the University of Leicester, Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith (Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Cambridge University), the UK's most distinguished historian of the Crusades, explored how views of Crusading have developed from the early 19th century to the present day. Click here for further details.

10) 'Scott, Scotland, and Romantic Studies', Roundtable, Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, 23 April 2008

The focus of this roundtable, organised by Edinburgh University's Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, was Ian Duncan's book Scott's Shadow: the Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (Princeton UP, 2007). Short talks were given by Penny Fielding, Alex Thomson, Susan Manning (all Edinburgh), and Tony Jarrells (South Carolina). These talks were followed by general discussion on Duncan's study and the issues it brings to the fore regarding the relationship of Scottish literature and history to Romantic studies more generally.

11) 2008 International Conference on Narrative, University of Texas at Austin, 1-4 May 2008

The 2008 International Conference on Narrative, sponsored by the International Society for the Study of Narrative and the University of Texas at Austin, featured four papers of particular Scott interest: Samuel Baker (Texas-Austin), 'The Talisman in The Professor’s House: Walter Scott, Willa Cather, and the Romance of Literary History', Bill Hardwig (Tennessee), 'The Influence of Walter Scott Was Strong Upon the Old South', Mari Hatavara (Tampere), 'The Problem of Narrating History in Walter Scott’s Redgauntlet', and Fiona Robertson (Birmingham City, UK), 'Emblems, Devices, and the Figure of the Substitute in Walter Scott and Stephen Crane'. Click here for the conference site and here for the programme.

12) 'A Reformed Scott', The Linklater Lecture by Professor David Hewitt, King's College Centre, King's College, University of Aberdeen, 9 May 2008

David Hewitt (Aberdeen) delivered the annual Linklater Lecture as part of the WORD 08 Writers Festival hosted by the University of Aberdeen. Professor Hewitt is editor-in-chief of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (EEWN) and Co-Director of the Walter Scott Research Centre. In addition to publishing many important articles on Scott, he has edited Scott on Himself: A Selection of the Autobiographical Writings of Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh : Scottish Academic Press, 1981), Scott and His Influence: The Papers of the Aberdeen Scott Conference, 1982 (Aberdeen : Association for Scottish Literary Studies, c1983) (with J. H. Alexander), and the Edinburgh Editions of The Antiquary (1995) and (with G. A. M. Wood) Redgauntlet (1996).

13) Livrets d'opéra et réécritures du patrimoine anglophone', Two-Day Conference, Université de Caen Basse Normandie, France, 9-10 May 2008

This conference, organized by the ERIBIA research team (Université de Caen Basse Normandie), featured two papers of Scott interest: 'The Lady of the Lake, La donna del lago: première entrée en scène de Walter Scott dans l’Opéra italien' by Liliane Lascoux (C.R.L.C, Paris IV) and 'La Jolie Fille de Perth de Bizet, ou, comment trahir et honorer Walter Scott' by Gilles Couderc (Caen). Click here for the conference programme. See Lascoux 2011 and Couderc 2011 for published versions of these papers.

14) 'War, Empire and Slavery, c.1790-1820', Three-Day Conference, University of York, 16-18 May 2008

The 8th Cultural History Conference organized by the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, University of York, highlighted 'Nations, Borders and Identities', a research project devoted to the comparative study of the experiences of European men and women in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, from 1790-1820. Of particular Scott interest was ‘Inappropriate for Soldiers?: Images of Warfare in the Early Waverley Novels’, a paper by Sharon Murphy (Trinity College Dublin). Click here for the conference site.

15) 'The Sederunt Book and the Sequestration of Archibald Constable & Co.', Paper by Dr Ross Alloway, SHARP 2008, Oxford Brookes University, 27 June 2008

Dr Alloway, a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Centre for the History of the Book, Edinburgh University, delivered this paper as part of SHARP 2008, the 16th annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, held at Oxford Brookes University. His talk focuses on the sequestration of Archibald Constable and Co., the principal publisher of Scott's Waverley Novels, an event which left Scott with crippling debts (see Financial Hardship). Click here for further details.

16) 'The Novel and its Borders', Three-Day International Conference, University of Aberdeen, 8-10 July 2008

This conference, organised by Aberdeen University's Centre for The Novel in association with the AHRC Institute for Irish and Scottish Studies, featured five papers of particular Scott interest: Hsin-Ying (Alice) Lin, (National Chung Cheng University), 'Victorian Historical Distance and Scottish Modernity in Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley (1814) and Ivanhoe (1819)', Alison Lumsden (Aberdeen), 'Narrative Experimentation and the Borders of the Novel: Scott's Late Fiction', Ainsley McIntosh (Aberdeen), '"Alive within the tomb": Narrative Closure, Enclosure and Disclosure in Marmion', Sally Newsome (Aberdeen), '"… And what are we now, in this foreign land?": Liminal Space and Count Robert of Paris', and Céline Sabiron (Paris IV), 'Mapping Borders: From the Corporeal to the Incorporeal in The Heart of Midlothian'. Click here for the conference site. 

17) 'An Electric Shock of Delight: Walter Scott and the Waverley Novels', Exhibition, Writers' Museum, Edinburgh, 19 July 2008-3 January 2009

This free exhibition at the Writers' Museum, Edinburgh, contributed to the celebration of ‘500 Years of Printing in Scotland (1508-2008)’ and marked the completion of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, the culmination of a project to produce a complete, critically edited edition of the Waverley Novels as Scott originally wrote them. The exhibition charted Scott's profound influence on great European writers and showed how his innovations permeated every form of art and entertainment in the nineteenth century. For further details, contact the Writers' Museum.

18) 'Evidence of Reading, Reading the Evidence', Three-Day Conference, Institute of English Studies, University of London, 21-23 July 2008

Organized by the Institute of English Studies, University of London in conjunction with the Open University, this conference highlighted ‘The Reading Experience Database 1450-1945' (RED). It sought to create a forum in which diverse approaches to charting the history of reading were brought into energetic debate, moving beyond the boundaries of specific institutions, disciplines, methodologies, geographical locations and time periods. Two papers were of particular Scott interest: ‘Rocks and their Readers: Adam Sedgwick, Walter Scott, and the Problem of Narrative’ by Adelene Buckland (Cambridge Victorian Studies Group) and ‘Reading History: Evidence of the Transatlantic Audience for the Historical Fiction of Sir Walter Scott, James Fenimore Cooper and Charles Dickens’ by Robert McParland (Felician College, New Jersey). Click here for the conference site.

19) 'Persistances gothiques dans la littérature et les arts de l'image', Conference, Centre Culturel International de Cerisy, Cerisy-la-Salle, France, 21-31 July 2008

This conference on the Neo-Gothic, hosted by the Centre Culturel International de Cerisy in collaboration with the Laboratoire 3L.AM of the Université du Maine, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Scott contre Hoffmann: le combat du gothique européen pour la modernité' by Victor Sage (East Anglia). An expanded version has subsequently been published in the Conference Proceedings (Paris: Editions Bragelonne, 2012).

20) 'Romantic Diversity': 16th Annual NASSR Conference, University of Toronto, 21-24 August 2008

The 16th Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism was held at Victoria College in the University of Toronto and took as its theme 'Romantic Diversity'. The Romantic period is marked by its striking engagement with the global diversity of nature and humanity. Abiding interests in universality, unity, continuity, and totality increasingly confront the consciousness of variety, otherness, difference, and divergence. Exploring the discovery as well as the production of diversity, this conference sought to examine its role in reshaping Romantic culture, thought, society, and knowledge. In addition to many papers of Scott interest, three were specifically devoted to Scott: Miranda Burgess (British Columbia), 'Scott, Scotland, and Romantic Information Culture', Ann Rigney (Utrecht), 'How Remembering Scott Helped (Re)Populate Scotland', and Suha Kudsieh (Trent), 'British Nationalism and Romantic Othering: Jews, Muslims, and Scotsmen in Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe and The Talisman'. Click here for the conference site.

21) 'Continuities and Innovations: Popular Print Cultures—Past and Present, Local and Global', International Conference, University of Alberta, 27-30 August 2008

This conference, hosted by the University of Alberta featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Walter Scott, Popular Literature and Power' by David Buchanan (Alberta).

22) 'Spinning Scotland: Exploring Literary and Cultural Perspectives', Postgraduate Conference, University of Glasgow, 13 September 2008

Hosted by the postgraduates of the Department of Scottish Literature, University of Glasgow, this one-day conference considered the metaphor of the fabric of the Scottish nation. It included two papers of particular Scott interest: '"Alive within the tomb": Narrative Closure, Enclosure and Disclosure in Marmion' by Ainsley McIntosh (Aberdeen) and 'Faeries & the Quest for National Identity in Sir Walter Scott’s The Monastery' by Yuko Yoshino (Edinburgh). Click here for the conference site.

23) ‘Cadell and the Crash (1825-26)’, Talk by Dr Ross Alloway, Edinburgh Bibliographical Society, National Library of Scotland, 18 September 2008

Dr Alloway is a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Centre for the History of the Book working on the diaries of Robert Cadell, initially a partner in Archibald Constable and Co., and subsequently Scott's principal publisher. His talk focuses on the sequestration (the Scottish term for bankruptcy proceedings) of Archibald Constable and Co., , an event which left Scott with crippling debts (see Financial Hardship). Click here for the 2008-2009 programme of meetings of the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society.

24) 'Romanticism and Place', Day Conference and Workshop, Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol, 24 September 2008

This event, hosted by the Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Limits and Borders in Walter Scott's Novels' by Céline Sabiron (Paris IV). Click here for the conference site.

25) 'Disrupting Victorian Studies', 39th Victorians Institute Conference, University of South Carolina, 3-4 October 2008

The 39th Conference of the Victorians Institute, hosted by the University of South Carolina, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Sir Walter Scott's The Monastery: Gothic Disruptions of History' by Chad May (Kansas Wesleyan). The keynote address, 'The Great Book of Nature: The Novel and the Science of Man' was delivered by Ian Duncan (Berkeley), author of numerous works on Scott including Scott's Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (2007). Click here for the conference programme.

26) 'Empire, Revolution, and New Identities: Geoculture and Geopolitics in Brown and his Contemporaries': 6th Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, 9-11 October 2008

The 6th Biennial Conference of the Charles Brockden Brown Society, held at the Technische Universität Dresden, emphasized current efforts to explore Brown and his era in terms of historical systems and forces that exceed traditional perspectives based on the nation-state. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: Susan Oliver's 'Landscaping Disaffection: The Ecology of Wastelands in Brown’s Edgar Huntly and Walter Scott’s The Bride of Lammermoor'. Dr Oliver (Salford University) is author of Scott, Byron and the Poetics of Cultural Encounter (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). Click here for the conference programme.

27) 'Secret Scotlands: Scott and Stevenson Dissect the Doctors’, Public Lecture by Prof. Caroline McCracken-Flesher, University of Edinburgh, 16 October 2008

In a lecture hosted by the Centre for Scottish Writing in the Nineteenth Century in association with the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the City of Literature, Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming) examined the relationship between nineteenth-century medical practices and fiction, exploring the literary responses of Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson to the Burke and Hare scandal of 1828. Professor Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming) is the author of Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Culture, Nation, and the New Scottish Parliament (Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2007).

28) 'The Work of Romanticism', 15th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, 16-19 October 2008

The 15th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism (ICR), hosted by Oakland University, featured two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Getting Paid in Count Robert of Paris' by Brian Goldberg (Minnesota) and 'Painting and the Work of History in Scott’s Bride of Lammermoor' by John M Peck (Emory). Click here for the conference site.

29) 'Benjamin Robert Haydon, Romanticism, and the Visual Arts: Romantic Painting, Romantic Writing', Two-Day Conference, University of Cincinnati and the Athenaeum of Ohio, 7-8 November 2008

This conference, hosted by the University of Cincinnati and the Athenaeum of Ohio, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Painting the Historical Novel: Walter Scott and the Visual Arts' by Christopher Scalia (The University of Virginia’s College at Wise).

30) 'From Ballads to Bed-Warmers: The Corson Collection of Walter Scott Material', Writers' Museum, Edinburgh, 12 noon, 11 November 2008

As part of Edinburgh's Festival of Libraries 2008, Dr Paul Barnaby gave a talk on Edinburgh University Library's major Corson Collection of Walter Scott material at the Writers' Museum, Edinburgh, venue for the exhibition 'An Electric Shock of Delight: Walter Scott and the Waverley Novels'. For more information contact the Writers' Museum or Paul Barnaby.

31) 'The Collapse of a Northern Rock: The Sequestration of Archibald Constable & Co.', Seminar by Dr Ross Alloway, Edinburgh Book History Seminar, 14 November 2008

The Edinburgh Book History Seminars are organized by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of Book. Dr Alloway is a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Centre for the History of the Book working on the diaries of the publisher Robert Cadell. His talk focused on the sequestration (the Scottish term for bankruptcy proceedings) of Archibald Constable and Co., the principal publisher of Scott's Waverley Novels, an event which left Scott with crippling debts (see Financial Hardship).

32) 'Walter Scott e a literatura brasileira', Lecture by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques, Universidade Estácio de Sá, Campus Petrópolis-Rio de Janeiro, 21 November 2008

Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques, lecturer in Comparative Literature at the Universide do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, discussed Scott's impact on Brazilian literature. Click here for more information (in Portuguese) and here for a list of Dr Henrique's recent Scott-related publications.

33) 'Ruskin and Scott', Seminar by Brian Ingram, Ruskin Research Seminar Series, Ruskin Research Centre, University of Lancaster, 4 December 2008

The Ruskin Research Centre at the University of Lancaster holds weekly research seminars during term time. The theme for 2008-2009 was 'Ruskin's Writers and Artists'. Brian Ingram (Lancaster) was until recently editor of the Ruskin Review and Bulletin. Click here for further information.

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2007

1) HUSSE 8: 8th Biennial Conference of the Hungarian Society for the Study of English, Szeged University, 25-27 January 2007

The 8th Biennial Conference of HUSSE (Hungarian Society for the Study of English), hosted by Szeged University, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Canonization of Walter Scott as the Inventor of the Historical Novel in Twentieth-Century Hungarian Reception' by Gertrud Szamosi (Pécs). Click here for an abstract and here for the conference programme.

2) 'The 19th Century Reception of Walter Scott in Germany and Austria', Talk by Prof. Norbert Bachleitner, Edinburgh Book History Seminar, 2 February 2007

The Edinburgh Book History Seminars are organized by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of Book. Prof. Bachleitner (Vienna) has published Quellen zur Rezeption des englischen und französischen Romans in Deutschland und Österreich im 19. Jahrhundert (Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1990) and edited Beiträge zur Rezeption der britischen und irischen Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts im deutschsprachigen Raum (Amsterdam; Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 2000). He has contributed a chapter on the Austrian reception of Scott to The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).

3) 6th Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS), University of Adelaide, South Australia, 7-10 February 2007

The 6th Biennial International Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS), held at the University of Adelaide, contained one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott’s Kenilworth and the Middle Ages' by Graham Tulloch (Flinders). Prof. Tulloch is author of The Language of Walter Scott: A Study of his Scottish and Period Language (1980) and has edited Ivanhoe (1998), The Siege of Malta, and, Bizarro (2008, with J. H. Alexander and Judy King), and The Shorter Fiction (2009, with Judy King) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels. For further information, see the conference site and programme.

4) 'Walter Scott and Accountancy', Lecture by Professor Sam McKinstry, Old Edinburgh Club, 14 February 2007

This lecture by guest speaker Prof. Sam McKinstry (Paisley) was part of the 2006-2007 Winter Programme of the Old Edinburgh Club. Prof. McKinstry has, in collaboration with Marie Fletcher, published a study of ‘The Personal Account Books of Sir Walter Scott’ (2002). For further information, click here.

5) 'Imagined Histories: The Novels of Walter Scott', Lecture by Manfred Malzahn, Zayed Centre for Heritage and History, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates, 5 March 2007

Manfred Malzahn is Professor of English at United Arab Emirates University. He is author of Scots: die Sprache der Schotten (5th edition, 2009) along with many scholarly articles on Scottish literature.

6) 2007 International Conference on Narrative, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., 15-18 March 2007

The 2007 International Conference on Narrative, sponsored by the International Society for the Study of Narrative, and co-sponsored by Georgetown University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Death’s Heir, Die’s Husband: Frank Osbaldistone’s Entrance into a Deadly Family History in Sir Walter Scott’s Rob Roy' by Catherine England (South Carolina). Click here for the conference site and here for the programme.

7) 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Sheraton Colony Square, Atlanta, GA, 22-25 March 2007

The 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) included two papers of particular Scott interest: '"Wonderful Wonder of Wonders’: Matthew Lewis’s Gothic Influence on Sir Walter Scott' by Bridget McFarland (Indiana) and 'The Problem with Nabobs: Walter Scott, Edmund Burke and the Anti-Commercial Rhetoric of Empire' by Jason Solinger (The Citadel). Further information from the conference site and programme.

8) 'The Reception of Scott in Europe', Address by Prof. Murray Pittock, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 5 April 2007

Murray Pittock, Bradley Professor of English Literature at Glasgow University, is editor of The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe (London: Continuum, 2006). Amongst his other publications are The Invention of Scotland: The Stuart Myth and the Scottish Identity (London: Routledge, 1991), The Myth of the Jacobite Clans (1995), Jacobitism (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998), Celtic Identity and the British Image (Manchester University Press, 1999), and Scottish and Irish Romanticism (Oxford University Press, 2008). Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

9) 'Trans, Pan, Inter: Cultures in Contact', ACLA 2007 Annual Meeting, Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico, 19-22 April 2007

The 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), hosted by the Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, included one paper of particular Scott interest: '"The Purple Land that England Lost"': Scott, Hudson, and Informal Empire' by Richard Maxwell (Yale). Professor Maxwell (1948-2010) was author of The Historical Novel in Europe, 1650-1950 and numerous articles on Scott. Further details from the conference site and programme.

10) 'The Real Age of Scott', Address by Dr Bill Bell, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 3 May 2007

Dr Bell is Director of the Centre for the History of the Book at Edinburgh University. He is general editor of the Edinburgh History of the Book in Scotland (Edinburgh University Press, 2007- ), and volume editor for vol. 3, Ambition and industry, 1800-80 (2007). Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

11) 'Debateable Lands: The Literature and Languages of South-West Scotland', Annual Conference of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies, Crichton Campus, Dumfries, 25-27 May 2007

The Annual Conference of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies was held at Crichton Campus, a remote campus for Glasgow University, the University of the West of Scotland, and Dumfries and Galloway College. It included two papers of particular Scott interest: '"Elfin Minstrelsy": Ballads, the Borders and the Romantic Imagination' by Sarah M. Dunnigan and 'Four Great Novels of the Covenanters: Scott, Hogg, Galt and Crockett' by Douglas Gifford (Glasgow). Click here for the conference site.

12) 'James Robertson and Walter Scott', Address by Martin Philip, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 7 June 2007

Martin Philip is a recent Edinburgh University graduate and now teaches for Open University and Edinburgh University. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

13) 'Literary Tourism and Nineteenth-Century Culture', International One-Day Conference, Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, 8 June 2007

Organised by the English Department of the Open University and the Institute of English Studies, University of London, this conference aimed to consider in a panoramic and synthetic fashion the emergence of nineteenth-century interest in literary sites, and the development of literary genres associated with this interest. Three papers were of particular Scott interest: Erin Hazard (Chicago), 'Building and Displaying the Nineteenth-Century Author's House: Literary Architecture & Architectural Literature' (which dealt extensively with Scott and Abbotsford), Paul Westover (Indiana), '"Our very life-blood is English life-blood"; The Problem of Literary Inheritance and the American Importation of Literary Tourism' (which considered the relationship between Scott and Washington Irving), and Shirley Foster (Sheffield), 'American Visitors and Anti-Tourism'. Drafts of the papers are accessible as PDF files on the conference site. The conference site features an image of Sir William Allan's painting of Scott Visiting Shakespeare's Tomb. (Expanded versions of some of the papers featured in the conference have subsequently appeared in Literary Tourism and Nineteenth-Century Culture, ed. Nicola J. Watson (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).) 

14) 'Vulnerability and Tolerance', Colloquium on Violence and Religion, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 4-8 July 2007

The 2007 Conference of the Colloquium on Violence and Religion (COV&R), hosted by the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Violent Victimhood and "Carnal Reason" in Scott's The Tale of Old Mortality' by Ian Dennis. Ian Dennis is Associate Professor in English at the University of Ottawa and author of Nationalism and Desire in Early Historical Fiction (1997).

15) 'Open the Book, Open the Mind', SHARP 2007, University of Minnesota, 11-14 July 2007

SHARP 2007, the 15th annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing was held at the University of Minnesota from Wednesday July 11 to Saturday 14 July. It included a session on 'Robert Cadell: Constable, the Crash, and the Legacy,' dealing with the collapse of Scott's principal publisher Archibald Constable & Co., an event which left Scott with crippling debts (see Financial Hardship). The session feature three papers: Peter Garside (Edinburgh), 'The Partnership of Archibald Constable and Robert Cadell, 1811–1826', Ross Alloway (Edinburgh), 'Cadell and the Crash', and Ruth M. McAdams (Edinburgh), 'Cadell, the Fisher Edition of the Waverley Novels, and Sir Walter Scott’s Literary Legacy'. Click here for a conference programme. (An expanded version of Dr Alloway's paper has subsequently appeared in Book History, 11 (2008).)

16) 'Emancipation, Liberation, Freedom', 2007 BARS/NASSR Conference, University of Bristol, 26-29 July 2007

In an event hosted by the Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol, the respective annual conferences of the British Association of Romantic Studies (BARS) and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) were combined for only the second time in the history of the organisations. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Freedom Deferred?: Scotland and Slavery from Walter Scott to James Robertson’ by Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming). Click here for the conference site.

17) 18th Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 29 July-5 August 2007

The 18th triennial congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, hosted by the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, included a paper by Elisa Lima Abrantes (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro), 'A Escócia celta: nacionalismo e resistencia cultural', which dealt extensively with Scott's Waverley.

18) 'Scott, Romance and "Real History"', 8th Quadrennial International Scott Conference, Oxford Brookes University, 30 July-3 August, 2007

The eighth meeting of the International Scott Conference was held at Oxford Brookes University from Monday 30 July to Friday 3 August. As well as affirming the centrality of Walter Scott’s achievement to the Romantic period, the conference stressed links with, and cognate studies of, other writers and art forms, both within the period (especially Hogg and Austen) and beyond, through criticism and literary influence. Plenary speakers were Ian Duncan (UC Berkeley), ‘Scott’s Shadow: Scott in Relation to the Writers of Early Nineteenth-century Edinburgh’; Ina Ferris (Ottowa), ‘Remnants and Remains: Traces of the Past in the Present’; Peter Garside (Edinburgh), ‘The Baron’s Books: Scott, Book-collecting, Multitextuality, Waverley and Bibliomania’; Nancy Goslee (Tennessee), ‘Fictions of Liberty: Women Writers, Women Characters, and the Figure of Wallace’. Details of the rest of the programme are available at the conference site.

19) 'Sir Walter Scott and John Henry Newman', Remarks by Patrick Killough, 2007 Convention of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association, Pittsburgh Holiday Inn, 10 August 2007

The annual convention of the Venerable John Henry Newman Association included a talk by retired diplomat Patrick Killough on Scott's influence on Newman, the text of which is available here. Along with his wife Dr Mary Klein Killough, Mr Killough also taught an introductory adult education survey of Scott ('Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832): Crusaders, Ministrels, and Stuart Kings') for Montreat College, North Carolina, in October-November 2007. Click here for further details.

20) Festival of Politics 2007, The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, 24-26 August 2007

As part of the Scottish Parliament's third annual Festival of Politics, the Rowan Tree Theatre Company performed The Journey of Jeannie Deans, a dramatic adaptation of Scott's The Heart of Mid-Lothian by Judy Steel, in the Parliament's Debating Chamber on Friday 24 August. The company had premiered the play at Bowhill Theatre, near Selkirk, on 29 March 2007, transferring to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe from 3-14 August 2007. The production subsequently toured the Scottish Borders throughout August and September 2007.

21) Premiere of a New Recital by Ronald Stevenson, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 7 September 2007

A premiere of settings of Scott texts by Sir Walter's daughter Sophia. Ronald Stevenson is a Fellow of the Royal Northern College of Music and a distinguished composer, virtuoso and pianist. His first song-setting was of Sir Walter Scott's 'The Violet'. He was accompanied by his grand-daughter, Anna-Wendy, a renowned folk and classical violinist. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

22) 'The Enclave of my Nation', Sixth Annual Crosscurrents Conference, Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Aberdeen, 7-9 September 2007

The Sixth Annual Crosscurrents Conference, hosted by Aberdeen University's Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies, included one paper of particular Scott interest: '"Grand Napoleons of the Realm of Print": Lockhart, Scott, and "Filthy Lucre"' by Dan Wall (Aberdeen). A print version of this paper has subsequently appeared in the Conference Proceedings (Aberdeen: AHRC Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, 2008). Click here for the conference programme.

23) 'The Voice of the People: The European Folk Revival, 1760-1914', International Interdisciplinary Conference, Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, University of Sheffield, 7-9 September 2007

Organized by the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies in association with the School of English, Department of Germanic Studies, Department of History, and National Centre for English Cultural Tradition, this conference aimed to encompass the span of the European folk revival from its beginnings in the middle of the eighteenth century to its cataclysm, the war of the peoples, World War One. Papers examined the revival’s British emergence from 1760 in works such as Macpherson’s Ossian or Percy’s Reliques, its reception and philosophical development in Germany by J.G. Herder, and its further elaboration by British, German and French Romanticism. They also considered the folkloristic or popular-cultural dimensions both of nineteenth-century socialist utopias and of the diverse national movements of nineteenth century Europe . Together with numerous papers of Scott interest, the programme included a paper by Michael MacDonald (Alberta) on 'Folksinger and Folksong in Walter Scott’s Novels'. For further details, visit the conference site.

24) 'Understanding the Audience', Bi-Annual Conference of the Reception Studies Society, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 27-29 September 2007

The second Bi-Annual Conference of the Reception Studies Society, hosted by the University of Missouri-Kansas City, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'New England Readers of Walter Scott in the 1820s' by Emily B. Todd (Westfield State College). Click here for the conference programme.

25) 'Neomedievalisms', 22nd International Conference on Medievalism, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, 4-6 October 2007

The 22nd International Conference on Medievalism, organized by the International Society for the Study of Medievalism, explored 'neomedievalism', a term first proposed by Umberto Eco referring to a modern desire to dream the Middle Ages and to make them anew. It included two papers of particular Scott interest: 'A Thing to Dream of Not to Build: John Ruskin, Walter Scott, and the Ethics of Neomedievalism' by Christine Bolus-Reichert (Toronto) and 'Neo-Medieval Adaptations of the Myth of Saladin: The Case of Sir Walter Scott's Talisman (1825) and Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven (2005)' by Suha Kudsieh (Trent). Click here for the conference programme.

26) 'Scott, Wilderness, and North America', Address by Jenni Calder, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 10 October 2007

Jenni Calder, formerly of the National Museums of Scotland, has written many books on Scottish history and culture and co-authored the volume Scott (London: Evans Brothers, 1969) with Angus Calder. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

27) 'Romantic Objects', 14th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, Towson University and Loyola College, Maryland, 18-21 October 2007

The 14th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism (ICR), hosted jointly by Towson University and Loyola College, included a panel on 'Scott, History, and the State', featuring the following papers: Anne Frey (Loyola University of New Orleans), 'Governing Objects: State Power in The Heart of Midlothian', Angela E. Runciman (SUNY-Binghamton), 'Scott’s "Eddies": Waverley, Historical Production, and German Romanticism', Jeffrey Scraba (Memphis), 'Reproducing Histories: Walter Scott’s Gabions', and Ryan D. Shirey (Washington University in St. Louis), 'National Objects and "Nonsensical Trash": Scott’s Reliquiae Trotcosienses and the Material of Scottish Literary History'. For further information see the conference site and programme.

28) XV Semana Interdisciplinar de Estudos Anglo-germânicos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 22-26 October 2007

The 15th Semana Interdisciplinar de Estudos Anglo-germânicos, hosted by the Faculdade de Letras of the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, included two papers by Elisa Lima Abrantes (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro), 'Escocia: a construção de uma identidade nacional pela literatura' and 'A invenção romântica de uma identidade celta para a Irlanda e a Escócia' , touching respectively on Scott's contribution to Scotland's national literary identity and on his role in creating a Celtic identity for Scotland.

29) VEAB Conference, Veszprém, Hungary, 7 November 2007

This conference, organized by the Veszprém Branch of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'History and Fiction in Hungarian Critiques of Walter Scott' by Emília Szaffner (University of West Hungary). In addition to journal articles on Scott, Dr Szaffner is the author of 'The Hungarian Reception of Walter Scott in the Nineteenth Century' in The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe, ed Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).

30) 'Scott and the Covenanters', Address by Prof. Douglas Gifford, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 22 November 2007

Prof. Gifford (University of Glasgow) is Honorary Librarian of Scott’s Library at Abbotsford and Director of the Abbotsford Library Research Project Trust, a joint venture of The Advocates Library in Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, which is stock-checking Scott's Library, publishing unpublished material, and undertaking further research into Scott's book collection. Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

31) 'Walter Scott's Mistress of Pain', Seminar by Simon Edwards, Centre for Research in Romanticism, Roehampton University, London, 28 November 2007

As part of a series of Research Seminars run by the Centre for Research in Romanticism, Roehampton University, Simon Edwards (Roehampton) discussed Scott's The Talisman and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch. Dr Edwards has published essays on Dryden, Scott, Dickens, Cooper and a number of other European novelists of the nineteenth century (see Edwards 2001 and Edwards 2003).

32) 'Annotating Waverley', Address by Prof. Peter Garside, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 6 December 2007

Peter Garside is Professor of Bibliography and Textual Studies at the University of Edinburgh and was the founding Chair of the Centre for Editorial & Intertextual Research at Cardiff University. Among many Scott-related publications, he has edited The Black Dwarf (1993), Guy Mannering (1999), and Waverley (2007) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels, and The Visionary for University College Cardiff Press (1984). Further details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

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2006

1) 'You Can't Go Home Again: From Scott to the Scottish Parliament', Talk by Caroline McCracken-Flesher, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 9 February 2006

Professor Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming) is the author of Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Culture, Nation, and the New Scottish Parliament (Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2007). Her talk considered Scott’s ideas, especially as propounded in The Bride of Lammermoor, The Pirate, and St. Ronan’s Well, as crucial to the foundation of a new Scotland. Full details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club. (A print version of Prof. McCracken-Flesher's talk subsequently appeared in the 2006 Annual Bulletin of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.)

2) 'Crusades: Medieval Worlds in Conflict', International Symposium, Saint Louis University, 15-18 February 2006

This symposium, organized by the Crusades Studies Forum at Saint-Louis University, included a lecture of particular Scott interest: 'Perceptions of the Crusades from Sir Walter Scott to Osama bin Laden' by Jonathan Riley-Smith, Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History at Cambridge University. Click here for the conference site.

3) 'Crossing Borders: James Hogg and the Global Context of British Romanticism', 12th James Hogg Society Conference, Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, Mississippi, 6-8 April 2006

The 12th Biennial Conference of the James Hogg Society, hosted by the Mississippi University for Women, included one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Who Is the King Now?’ Hogg’s Three Perils of Man and Scott’s Castle Dangerous’ by Graham Tulloch (Flinders). An online article, developing some of the ideas explored in this paper, was subsequently published in antiTHESIS Forum, 3 (2006). Click here for more information, including a brief précis. Prof. Tulloch is author of The Language of Walter Scott: A Study of his Scottish and Period Language (1980) and has edited Ivanhoe (1998), The Siege of Malta, and, Bizarro (2008, with J. H. Alexander and Judy King), and The Shorter Fiction (2009, with Judy King) for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels.

4) 'Across the Water: Ireland and Scotland in the Nineteenth Century', Annual Conference of the Society for the Study of Nineteenth-Century Ireland, Institute of Ulster Scots Studies, University of Ulster, Magee, 16-17 June 2006

The Annual Conference of the Society for the Study of Nineteenth-Century Ireland, hosted by the Institute of Ulster Scots Studies, University of Ulster, Magee, included one paper of particular Scott interest: '"Between ancient Egyptians and vagrants of European descent": The Collation of "Oriental Gypsies" and Irish-Scottish "Tinkers" in the Writings of Sir Walter Scott’ by Mary M. Burke (Notre Dame). Dr Burke, who now teaches at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, is author of the forthcoming 'Tinkers': Synge and the Cultural History of the Irish Traveller (Oxford University Press, 2009).

5) 'Dream, Imagination, and Reality in Literature', International Literary Conference, University of South Bohemia, Ceské Budejovice, Czech Republic, 30 June-2 July 2006

This three-day international conference, organized by the English Department of the University of South Bohemia, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Signifying on Scots: Chesnutt's Parodies of Sir Walter Scott' by Christopher E. Koy (University of West Bohemia). A print version has subsequently appeared in South Bohemian Anglo-American Studies, 1 (2007). Click here for the conference programme.

6) ‘Trading Books - Trading Ideas’, SHARP 2006, The Hague/Leiden (Netherlands), 11-14 July 2006

The 14th annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing was organized by the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands) in co-operation with the Universities of Leiden, Utrecht, Nijmegen, and Amsterdam. It featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Post-War Scott: East and West German Receptions of Walter Scott’s Novels (1949-1990)' by Annika Bautz (Keele). Dr Bautz, who now works at Zurich University, is author of The Reception of Jane Austen and Walter Scott: A Comparative Longitudinal Study (London; New York: Continuum, 2007). A print version of her paper appeared in The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006). Click here for the conference site.

7) 'Transatlanticism in American Literature: Emerson, Hawthorne, and Poe', International Conference, Rothermere American Institute, Oxford University, 13-16 July 2006

This conference, sponsored by the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, the Nathaniel Hawthorne Society, and the Poe Studies Association, and hosted by the Rothermere American Institute, Oxford University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"Could it indeed be Rowena at all?": Poe’s Rewriting of Scott' by Jennifer Camden (Ohio State). Dr Camden has subsequently published  Secondary Heroines in Nineteenth-Century British and American Novels (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010), which includes a chapter on the heroines of Ivanhoe and Waverley (see Camden 2010).

8) 'RLS2006: Transatlantic Stevenson’, 4th Biennial Stevenson Conference, Hotel Saranac, Saranac Lake, New York, 18-20 July 2006

The 4th Biennial Stevenson Conference, hosted by the Hotel Saranac, included one paper which dealt, in particular, with Stevenson's debt to Scott: ‘Cross-Channel Stevenson: David Balfour and the Problem of Scottish Return’ by Prof. Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming). Prof. McCracken-Flesher is the author of Possible Scotlands: Walter Scott and the Story of Tomorrow (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005) and editor of Culture, Nation, and the New Scottish Parliament (Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2007). Click here for an abstract of her paper.

9) 'The Lie of the Land: Scottish Landscape and Culture', Four-Day Conference, University of Stirling, 27–30 July 2006

The Centre for Scottish Studies at the University of Stirling hosted this conference on the representation and interpretation of landscape in Scottish cultural production, including literature, drama, music, film, TV, print media, Scottish history, Scottish studies and the visual arts. The central aim was to explore and compare the creative tensions between representation and reality and how the Scottish landscape has been perceived in creative, historical, canonical, critical, and theoretical terms. Plenary lectures were delivered by Neal Ascherson, Prof. Lawrence Buell (Harvard), Prof. Stephen Duguid (Simon Fraser ), and Prof. Murdo Macdonald (Dundee). The novelist James Robertson gave a reading from his work. While none of the papers was exclusively devoted to Scott, a number touched upon his treatment of landscape, urban or rural, Lowland or Highland.

10) 'O local, o regional, o nacional, o inter-nacional, o planetário: lugares dos discursos literários e culturais', X Congresso Internacional ABRALIC, Rio de Janeiro, 31 July-4 August 2006

The 10th International Conference of the Associação Brasileira de Literatura Comparada (Brazilian Comparative Literature Association) included a paper by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro), 'Scott e Alencar: escritores escrevendo a sua história', comparing the novels of Scott and the Brazilian novelist José de Alencar (1829-77). A print version of the paper has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings Lugares dos discursos: literários e culturais: o local, o regional, o nacional, o inter-nacional, o planetário, ed. José Luis Jobim (Rio de Janeiro: EdUFF, 2006). Click here for the conference site. 

11) ESSE-8: 8th Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, Institute of English Studies, University of London, 29 August- 2 September 2006

The Eighth Conference of ESSE (European Society for the Study of English) at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, included one paper of particular Scott interest. 'The Role of Reception in George Cruikshank’s Early Career (1811-1825)' by Françoise Baillet (IUFM Academy, Versailles) charted Cruikshank's change of direction in the 1820s from broadsheet caricature to book illustration (including the Waverley Novels). Click here for the conference site.

12) NASSR/NAVSA 2006 Conference, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, 31 August-3 September 2006

The combined conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) and the North American Victorian Studies Association (NAVSA) featured two Scott-related papers. Daniel Schierenbeck (Central Missouri ) spoke on '"Discipline is a capital thing": The Science of War in Scott's Old Mortality' and Emily Haddad (South Dakota) on 'Techniques of Economic Stewardship: Scott's The Talisman'. Click here for the conference site.

13) 'Victorian Cultures in Conflict', BAVS Seventh Annual Conference, University of Liverpool, 7-9 September 2006

The Seventh Annual Conference of the British Association for Victorian Studies (BAVS) investigated the origins, nature, and influence of the intellectual, political, ideological, and spiritual debates which shaped Victorian cultures of every kind. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Walter Scott: Beneficent Enchanter in a Land of Conflict’ by Brian Ingram (Lancaster). Click here for the conference programme.

14) Musical Event: The Lay of The Last Minstrel, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 8 September 2006

Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

15) 'Scottish Romanticism and World Literatures', Three-Day Conference, University of California, Berkeley, 8–10 September 2006

Hosted by the Center for British Studies and English Department at Berkeley and jointly organized by Murray Pittock (Manchester) and Ian Duncan (Berkeley), this conference explored the following areas: the impact of Scottish Romanticism on European literatures, the Anglophone British Empire and the United States; continuities between Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism; relations between Scotland and Ireland, and between Scottish and English Romanticisms; “literature” and the disciplines of the natural and human sciences; the social environments of periodical culture, book production and the literary market; tradition and genre; and sessions on major authors. Plenary lectures were delivered by Robert Crawford (St Andrews), Cairns Craig (Aberdeen), Luke Gibbons (Notre Dame), Susan Manning (Edinburgh), Murray Pittock (Manchester), and David Simpson (California, Davis) who discussed 'Walter Scott's Foreigners' with particular reference to the Tales of the Crusades (The Talisman and The Betrothed). Besides a number of contributions touching on Scott's work, over twenty papers specifically focussed on Scott, dealing with his reception in Ireland, France, Russia, the United States, Canada, and Latin America by writers and artists in a variety of media. David Hewitt and Alison Lumsden, Co-Directors of the Walter Scott Research Centre (Aberdeen University) led a workshop on the goals of, problems faced by, and image(s) of Scott generated by the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (published by Edinburgh University Press). Click here for the conference site. (Expanded versions of two of the papers given at this conference have subsequently appeared in Bruzelius 2007 and Van Kooy 2007.)

16) 1st International Conference on Nation and Identity in 19th and 20th Century Literature in English, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Spain, 14-16 September 2006

The inaugural International Conference on Nation and Identity in 19th and 20th Century Literature in English, hosted by the Language Department of the Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott y la deconstrucción del patrón identitario' by Montserrat Martínez García (Universidad Complutense de Madrid). Dr Martínez García has recently completed a Ph.D. thesis on 'La subversión de la nación en la novela histórica de Walter Scott: relectura de Waverley, Old Mortality y The Heart of Midlothian en clave postmoderna'. Click here for a (provisional) conference programme.

17) 'Il personaggio: figure della dissolvenza e della permanenza = Character in Literature: Patterns of Evanescence and Permanence', 4th Annual Conference of the Associazione per gli Studi di Teoria e Storia Comparata della Letteratura, University of Turin, Italy, 14-16 September 2006

The 4th Annual Conference of the Associazione per gli Studi di Teoria e Storia Comparata della Letteratura, hosted by the University of Turin, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Rebecca, la bella ebrea: l’eroina del romanzo Ivanhoe tra scrittura e illustrazioni' by Michela Mancini (Siena). An expanded version has subsequently appeared in Il personaggio: figure della dissolvenza e della permanenza, ed. Chiara Lombardi (Alessandria: Edizioni dell’Orso, 2008). Dr Mancini is the author of Immaginando 'Ivanhoe': romanzi illustrati, balli e opere teatrali dell'Ottocento italiano (Milan: B. Mondadori, 2007). Click here for the conference programme.

18) 'Reclaiming Adam Smith', International Conference for the Study of Political Thought, Columbia University, New York, 22-23 September 2006

The 2006 annual meeting of the International Conference for the Study of Political Thought (CSPT), hosted by Columbia University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Fate of Sympathy: Hume, Smith, Scott, Hogg' by Ian Duncan (Berkeley). Along with many articles on Scott, Prof. Duncan is author of Modern Romance and Transformations of the Novel: The Gothic, Scott, Dickens (1992) and Scott's Shadow: The Novel in Romantic Edinburgh (Princeton, 2007). He has recently co-edited (with Evan Gottlieb) Approaches to Teaching Scott’s Waverley Novels (2009). Click here to read Prof. Duncan's paper.

19) XIV Semana Interdisciplinar de Estudos Anglo-germânicos, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 2-6 October 2006

The 14th Semana Interdisciplinar de Estudos Anglo-germânicos, hosted by the Faculdade de Letras of the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, included a paper on Scott's verse by Elisa Lima Abrantes (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro): 'O poeta Sir Walter Scott'.

20) 'Scott and the Edinburgh Reviewers', Talk by Stephen E. Woolman QC, Keeper of the Library, Faculty of Advocates, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 5 October 2006

Stephen E. Woolman QC was Keeper of the Advocates Library until his appointment to the Bench (March 2008) with the judicial title of Lord Woolman. Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

21) Lecture by Prof. Graham Tulloch, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 25 October 2006

Prof. Tulloch (Flinders University, Adelaide) is the author of The Language of Walter Scott: A Study of his Scottish and Period Language (André Deutsch, 1980). He has edited the Oxford World Classics edition of The Two Drovers and Other Stories (1987) and three volumes for the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels: Ivanhoe (1998), Shorter Fiction (with Judy King, 1998) and The Siege of Malta and Bizarro (with J. H. Alexander and Judy King). Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

22) 'Waverley and the Object of (Literary) History', Seminar by Prof. Michael Gamer, Centre for Research in Romanticism, Roehampton University, London, 25 October 2006

As part of a series of Research Seminars run by the Centre for Research in Romanticism, Roehampton University, Michael Gamer (Pennsylvania) discussed Scott's Waverley. Prof. Gamer is author of Romanticism and the Gothic: Genre, Reception, and Canon Formation (Cambridge University Press, 2000). See Gamer 2000, Gamer 2002a, Gamer 2002b, Gamer 2004, and Gamer 2008 for recent Scott-related articles and chapters.

23) Burney Society 2006 Meeting, Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, Tucson, Arizona, 26-27 October 2006

The 2006 Annual Meeting of the Burney Society, held at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Borders, Invasions, Contested Spaces and Margins in 1814: Waverley, Patronage, Mansfield Park, and The Wanderer' by Margaret Doody (Notre Dame).  Click here for the conference programme.

24) 'Engaged Romanticism: Romanticism as Praxis', 13th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, Arizona State University, 9-12 November 2006

The 13th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism (ICR) at Arizona State University focussed on the activist dimension of Romanticism as it sought to transform the public sphere through its engagements with, and commitments to, matters artistic, musical, philosophical, poetic, political, and/or theological. The conference sought equally to explore the ways that Romantic Studies itself pursues analogous forms of engagement with the world. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: '"A Felt Relation": Genre as Cultural Dialogue in Walter Scott’s Waverley' by Daniel Block (Brown). Click here for the conference site.

25) 'Rediscovering Scott for a New Generation', Address by Lady Steel, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 22 November 2006

Lady Judy Steel is the author of The Journey of Jeannie Deans, a dramatic adaptation of The Heart of Mid-Lothian premiered at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2007. Details from the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club.

26) 'An Evening with Sir Walter Scott', Elizabeth Bay House, Sydney, New South Wales, 24 November 2006

This event was part of a public programme created by the Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales looking at the life and works of Sir Walter Scott, principally in terms of his relevance to colonial society in Sydney. Most of the significant historic sites in Sydney were designed in the Gothic Revival style, and a riverside suburb is called Abbotsford. On Friday 24 November, the Trust hosted a talk in the Library of Elizabeth Bay House on the life and works of Scott, with visual material to stimulate discussion about his influence on design, a display of his books, and performances of poetry and prose.

27) Scott's Selkirk 2006, 2-3 December 2006

Scott’s Selkirk was a Millennium project that proved so popular that it has become an established part of the Selkirk calendar. For the first weekend in December, the town centre reverts to Scott's day, with most shopkeepers dressing themselves and their windows appropriately. The Court House is used to re-enact court cases heard by Sir Walter as Sheriff-Depute of Selkirkshire (see Professional Life). There are re-enactments of the False Alarm of 1804 (when the town's men rallied to beacons warning of a French invasion, an event recalled in The Antiquary) and of the 1815 Carterhaugh Ba’ Game which was attended by both Sir Walter and James Hogg. This year, besides a variety of street entertainments, there were performances and exhibitions involving Borders Youth Theatre, the Traditional Music School (based at Selkirk High School), Selkirk Film Club, and Selkirk Camera Club. Other attractions included a ceilidh, carol-singing, a Poetry Corner, an Age of Chivalry experience, a Food Court, horse-drawn carriage and Sedan Chair rides, tours of the town, a children’s Carousel, and a dedicated area for traditional games for children. Of particular interest to students of Scott was a presentation on 'Scott and the Borders' by Prof. David Purdie, accompanied by the renowned folksinger Norman Stewart, who interspersed the narrative with ballads from Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border.

28) 30th International AEDEAN Conference, University of Huelva, Spain, 14-16 December 2006

The 30th annual, international conference of the Asociación Española de Estudios Anglo-Norteamericanos (AEDEAN), hosted by the University of Huelva, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Bridging Cultures and Languages: Towards the Creation of a Hybrid Identity in Walter Scott’s Waverley' by Montserrat Martínez García (Universidad Complutense de Madrid). A print version of Dr Martínez García's paper has subsequently appeared (in CD-ROM form) as part of the published proceedings of the conference (Universidad de Huelva, 2007). Click here for the conference programme.

29) Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 27-30 December 2006

At the 122nd Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association, the Scottish Literature Discussion Group organized a number of symposia and other events on Scottish literary and linguistic topics, including the following sessions: 'Orality, Literacy, Print: Technologies of the Spoken and Written Word in Scotland', 'A Celebration of the Life and Work of David Daiches (1912-2005)', 'Press Ganged? Revisiting Robert Louis Stevenson', and 'Periodicals in Romantic Edinburgh, 1802-32'. Three papers were of particular Scott interest: Andrew Hook (Glasgow), 'David Daiches, Eighteenth-Century Scottish Literature, and Sir Walter Scott', Juliet Shields (Binghampton), 'From Legendary Lore to Two-Volume Novel: The Transmission of Scottish Identity in Scott’s Bride of Lammermoor’, and Morton D. Paley, 'Coleridge, Scott, and the Metrics of Christabel'. Click here for the Convention site.

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2005

1) HUSSE 7: 7th Biennial Conference of the Hungarian Society for the Study of English, Veszprém University, 27-29 January 2005

The 7th Biennial Conference of HUSSE (Hungarian Society for the Study of English), hosted by Veszprém University (now the University of Pannonia), included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Customs and Costumes: Ethnicity in the Novels of Walter Scott and Mór Jókai' by Emília Szaffner (Veszprém). In addition to journal articles on Scott, Dr Szaffner is the author of 'The Hungarian Reception of Walter Scott in the Nineteenth Century' in The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe, ed Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).

2) 'Lectures du Moyen Âge', Three-Day Conference, Université de Bretagne-Sud (Lorient), France, 31 March-2 April 2005

The 2005 meeting of the research network Modernités médiévales, held at the Université de Bretagne-Sud, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Les châteaux dans Ivanhoé: archéologie et histoire, nationalisme et morale' by Marie Casset (Bretagne-Sud). A print version has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings (Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2006).

3) 'Crossing the Highland Line: Cross-Currents in 18th-Century Scottish Writing', Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Sleat, Isle of Skye, 20-22 May 2005

The 18th century contains some of Scotland’s most important and accomplished literature in both the Gaelic and the Lowland traditions. The 2005 Annual Conference of the Association of Scottish Literary Studies held at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was the first conference to explore the connections between them. Of particular Scott interest was 'Scott and the Highlands', a paper by Professor David Hewitt (Aberdeen). Click here for the conference site.

4) 'International Colloquium on the Reception of Scott in Europe: The Nationalities Question', Clare Hall College, Cambridge, 28-29 May 2005

This first conference exclusively dedicated to Scott's European reception brought together the international group of scholars working on Scott in the Reception of British and Irish Authors in Europe Research Project, providing a forum for the presentation of work in progress and the exchange of ideas. It also provided an opportunity to investigate more deeply the relationship between Scott and national identities in nineteenth-century Europe. Expanded versions of several of the papers subsequently appeared in The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).Click here for the conference site.

5) Annual Conference of the Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, 28 May-5 June 2005

The Annual Conference for the Association for Canadian and Quebec Literatures (ACQL) featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Le Manoir mystérieux and Kenilworth: Colonial Authorship and Plagiarism in Houde and Walter Scott' by Andrea Cabajsky (Moncton). Click here for the conference site.

6) 'Victorian Life Writing: Sources and Resources', Three-Day Conference, Ruskin Research Centre, University of Lancaster, 21-23 July 2005

Hosted by the Ruskin Research Centre, this conference explored the records of Victorian writers' lives, written both by themselves and others, covering not only biographies but also more marginal forms of textuality, including journals, diaries and letters. It included one paper of particular Scott interest: ‘Walter Scott: Beneficent Enchanter in a Land of Conflict’ by Brian Ingram (Lancaster). Click here for further details.

7) 'Material Cultures and the Creation of Knowledge', Three-Day Conference, University of Edinburgh, 22-24 July 2005

Hosted by Edinburgh University's Centre for the History of the Book, this conference featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Illustrating the Waverley Novels: Scott's Publishers and the Popularisation of the Illustrated Novel' by Richard Hill (Edinburgh), who formerly worked on this site. Click here for the conference site.

8) 'Romanticism’s Debatable Lands', The British Association for Romantic Studies Biennial Conference, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 28-31 July 2005

Besides a plenary lecture by James Chandler (University of Chicago) on ‘Edgeworth and Scott: The Literature of “‘Reterritorialization”’, the biennial conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies devoted three sessions to Scott and included several other papers on aspects of his work. The following is a full list of Scott-related papers: Annika Bautz (Newcastle), 'Temporal Borders: Introducing Walter Scott to Twentieth-Century Readers', Penny Fielding (Edinburgh), 'Scott's The Antiquary and the Inscription of the Nation', Michael Gamer (Pennsylvania), 'Scott, Barbauld, and the Rise of the (Reprinted) Novel', Mike Goode (Syracuse), 'Reading for the Plots: Walter Scott and Romantic Conspiracy-Mongering', Caroline Jackson-Houlston (Oxford Brookes), '"She herself must venture … beyond the prescribed boundary": The Construction of Gender and Cultural Difference through the Orientalist Fiction of Scott and Bage', Donald MacKenzie (Glasgow), 'Romance versus History: The Monastery and The Abbot as Borderland Texts', Caroline McCracken-Flesher (Wyoming), 'Remembering the Future: Making Memory in Scott's Redgauntlet', Silvia Mergenthal (Konstanz),'"Straight from the Heart": Mapping Scott's The Heart of Midlothian', Meiko O'Halloran (Oxford), 'Hogg, Scott and Mary, Queen of Scots in the Borders', Susan Oliver (Cambridge), '"Looking back on a Highland Prospect": Scott, The Lady of the Lake and the Lowland/Celtic Fringe', Christopher Scalia (Wisconsin-Madison), 'The Economics of Antiquarianism in Sir Walter Scott's Prefatory Material', Ken Simpson (Strathclyde), 'Of Gabions and Hobby-Horses: Scott's Reliquiae Trotcosienses and "Sterne's Celebrated Metaphor', Nicola Watson (Open University) '"Storied Vicinities": Scott and the Making of the Nineteenth-Century Literary Tourist', and Fiona Wilson (Bard College), 'Contested Borders: Gender, Territory, and Hysteria in Rob Roy'. Click here for the conference site. (Expanded versions of the papers by Susan Oliver and Fiona Wilson have recently appeared in Romanticism's Debatable Lands, ed. Claire Lamont and Michael Rossington (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).)

9) 'Deviance & Defiance', 7th Biannual Conference of the International Gothic Association/13th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, University of Montreal, 11-14 August 2005

The Seventh Biannual Conference of the International Gothic Association dovetailed with the 13th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) to foster intellectual exchanges between the two groups. It featured six papers of particular Scott interest: Andrea Cabus (Temple), 'Walter Scott and Emma: Reader Reformation', Carol Margaret Davison (Windsor), 'Gothic Scotland/Scottish Gothic: Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley as Cultural Battlefield', Mike Goode (Syracuse), 'Reading for the Plots: Walter Scott and Romantic Conspiracy-Mongering', Andrew Lincoln (Queen Mary, London), 'Scott, Patriotism and the Politics of Transgression', Lisa Nevarez (Siena College), 'Deviant Witchery: Scapegoating Madge Wildfire in Sir Walter Scott’s The Heart of Midlothian', and Kathryn Pratt (Auburn), 'Walter Scott, French and American Theater, and the European South in 1820s New Orleans'. Click here for the programme.

10) IX Congresso Nacional de Lingüística e Filologia, Rio de Janeiro, 22-26 August 2005

The 7th Congresso Nacional de Lingüística e Filologia, organized by the Círculo Fluminense de Estudos Filológicos e Lingüísticos, included a paper by Elisa Lima Abrantes (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro), 'Walter Scott e a celtificação da Escócia em Waverley', exploring how an idealized, Celtic image of Scotland is created through Scott's characters' language in Waverley. Click here for the conference site and here for résumés of the conference papers.

11) 'Sullivanhoe: The Disinherited Opera', Sir Arthur Sullivan Society Conference, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, 1-2 October 2005

This conference was devoted to Sir Arthur Sullivan's 1890 opera Ivanhoe, based on Scott's novel. As well as a range of speakers who dealt with various aspects of the opera (technical aspects of the score, critical reception, performance history, recordings) there were live performances of music from Ivanhoe, other settings of Scott and other music by Sullivan. Click here for the Society's website.

12) 'La huella cervantina en la cultura anglosajona', Conference, Universidad de Valladolid, Spain, 16-19 November 2005

This conference at the Universidad de Valladolid on Cervantes's influence in the English-speaking world featured one paper of Scott interest: 'Quixotic Historicism: Don Quixote and Walter Scott' by Jeffrey Scraba (Rutgers). Click here for the conference programme.

13) 'Scottish Romanticism and the Enlightenment', Symposium and Exhibition, Margaret I. King Library, University of Kentucky, 18 November 2005

The University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences presented a one-day symposium and an exhibition of Scottish books and manuscripts from the 16th to the 19th centuries held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections. These included first and early editions and manuscript materials by Burns, Hogg, Scott, Stevenson, Doyle and others. Ian Duncan (University of California, Berkeley) led a seminar on 'Scottish Fiction and the National Imaginary' and gave a lecture 'What was Scottish Romanticism? Or, Whatever happened to the Scottish Enlightenment?' There were further talks by Patrick Scott (Director of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina) on 'Robert Burns and America' and Charlotte Fairlie (Wilmington College) on 'Teaching Scottish Literature'. In his opening remarks, Gurney Norman (University of Kentucky) explored links between Kentucky and Scotland. For further information, contact the organizer.

14) 'MLA 2005', 121st Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association, Washington, DC, 27-30 December 2005

The 121st Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Crossing "Dark Barriers": Intertextuality and Dialogue between Byron and Sir Walter Scott' by Susan Oliver (Cambridge). An expanded version of the paper has subsequently appeared in Studies in Romanticism, 47.1 (2008), 15-35. Dr Oliver (now of Essex University) is author of Scott, Byron, and the Poetics of Cultural Encounter (2005). Click here for further information.

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2004

1) 'Global Ethnic Networks: Old and New', ACLA 2004 Annual Meeting, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 15-18 April 2004

The 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), hosted by the University of Michigan, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Dandies in Plaid: Highland Style in Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley' by Sarah Rose Cole (Columbia). Further details from the conference site and programme.

2) Faculty of Advocates Words and Music Evening, including launch of Scott's Reliquiae Trotcosienses, Signet Library, Edinburgh, 23 April 2004

At this Faculty of Advocates event, Professor David Hewitt launched the Edinburgh University Press edition of Scott's Reliquiae Trotcosienses. Edited by Alison Lumsden and Gerard Carruthers, the Reliquiae have never previously been published as a complete work.

3) 3rd Annual International 'Crosscurrents' Conference, Trinity College Dublin, 23-25 April 2004

The Third Annual 'Crosscurrents' Conference, organized by the AHRC Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott's Jews and How They Shaped the Nation', by Ashley Hales (Edinburgh). A print version of this paper has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings Beyond the Anchoring Grounds: More Cross-Currents in Irish and Scottish Studies (Belfast: Cló Ollscoil na Banríona, 2005). Click here for the conference site.

4) 'Mutual Reception: A Special Case in Anglo-German Relations?', Working Group for the Reception of German/Austrian/Swiss Literature Workshop, Institute of Germanic Studies, University of London, 30 April 2004

This one-day workshop at the Institute of Germanic Studies (now part of the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies) included a paper by Dr Tom Hubbard (National Library of Scotland) on 'Scott and Volkspoesie on the Borders'. Dr Hubbard, who currently works at National University of Ireland Maynooth, has published widely on the reception and translation of Scottish writing, including a chapter on the pan-European reception of Scott's verse in The Reception of Walter Scott in Europe, ed. Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).

5) 'Geographies of the Eighteenth Century: The Question of the Global', Third Annual Bloomington Eighteenth-Century Studies Workshop, Indian University, 19-22 May 2004

The Third Annual Bloomington Eighteenth-Century Studies Workshop, hosted by the Center for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Indiana University, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'The Birth of the Post-Enlightenment Global' by Siraj Dean Ahmed (Mount Holyoke) which read Scott's Guy Mannering alongside James Mill's The History of British India (1817). Click here for the workshop programme.

6) 'Reason and Romance', One-Day Conference Held in Association with BARS, University of Sheffield, 22 May 2004

This conference, co-organized by BARS (British Association of Romantic Studies) and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies (University of Sheffield), set out to explore the interface between Reason and Romance during the period 1780 to 1820. Together with papers on Burns, Carlyle, Crabbe, Keats, Shelley, Mozart, Anna Barbauld, Maria Edgeworth, William Godwin, Mary Hays, Clara Reeves, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Wollstonecraft, there was a paper on 'Sentimental and Accountable Reading: Scott, Romance and History’ by Andrew Lincoln (Queen Mary, University of London). Dr Lincoln is the author of Walter Scott and Modernity (Edinburgh University Press, 2007).

7) 'La Storia nel romanzo (1800-2000)': XVI Colloquio Malatestiano di Letteratura, Rocca Malatestiana, Sant'Arcangelo di Romagna, Italy, 28-29 May 2004

This conference on historical fiction, hosted by the Associazione Sigismondo Malatesta, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"La storia mi salvò dalla completa dissipazione": Scott, Hardy e la terapia della storia' by Prof. Enrica Villari (Università Ca' Foscari di Venezia). An expanded version of this paper has subsequently appeared in La Storia nel romanzo (1800-2000), ed. Marinella Colummi Camerino (Rome: Bulzoni, 2008). Prof. Villari is responsible for an Italian translation of Scott's 'Essay on Chivalry' (Turin: Bollati Boringhieri, 1991).

8) 'The Wizard of the North: Confounding the Detractors', Lecture by Dr Ronald A. Silvester, Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club, 4 June, 2004

Dr Ronald A. Silvester is a member of the Edinburgh Sir Walter Scott Club. Contact the club for further information.

9) 'Ireland and Scotland: Conjoined Histories', Joint Annual Conference of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society and Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, Centre for Irish-Scottish Studies, Trinity College Dublin, 17-20 June 2004

The Joint Annual Conference of the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society/Cumann Éire san Ochtú Céad Déag and Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, hosted by the Centre for Irish-Scottish Studies, Trinity College Dublin, included two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Dwellers in Archaic Cultural Time: "Gypsies", "Irish Tinkers", and "Gaels" in Late Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century Scottish Writing' by Mary Burke (Notre Dame) and 'Blackmailing Sir Walter Scott: Where Have All His Letters Gone?' by Mary Anne Alburger (Aberdeen). Dr Burke subsequently further developed some of the themes of her paper in a chapter in To the Other Shore: Crosscurrents in Irish and Scottish Studies, ed. Neal Alexander, Shane Murphy and Anne Oakman (Belfast: Queen’s University Press, 2004). Click here for the conference programme.

10) 'James Hogg and the British Literary Canon', 11th James Hogg Society Conference, Ettrick Riverside Conference Centre, Selkirk, 12-14 July 2004.

Along with many papers which touched upon James Hogg's relations with his contemporary, Scott, this conference featured one paper, 'Authors and Minstrels: Hogg’s The Queen’s Wake, Walter Scott, and the Romantic Canon’ by Erik Simpson (Grinnell College) entirely devoted to the subject. Prof. Simpson has subsequently published Literary Minstrelsy, 1770-1830: Minstrels and Improvisers in British, Irish, and American Literature (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), which further explores some of the themes discussed in his paper. Click here for the James Hogg Society site, which includes details of Society publications and a full index to the journal Studies in Hogg and his World.

11) 'Travessias', IX Congresso Internacional da ABRALIC, Porto Alegre, Brazil, 18-21 July 2004

The 9th International Conference of the Associação Brasileira de Literatura Comparada (Brazilian Comparative Literature Association) included a paper by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro), 'A (re)escritura da história na ficção scottiana', on the rewriting of history in Scott's fiction. A print version subsequently appeared in Literatura e Comparativismo, 1 (2005). Click here for the conference site.

12) 'Tourism and Literature: Travel, Imagination and Myth', Conference, Harrogate, UK, 22-26 July 2004

This conference, organized by the Centre for Tourism and Cultural Change (CTCC) at Leeds Metropolitan University, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: Negotiating History: Tourists and Guides in Washington Irving’s Abbotsford' by Jeffrey Scraba (Rutgers). An audio version of Dr Scraba's paper is available in the conference proceedings which were issued by Leeds Metropolitan University as a CD-ROM.

13) 'A Summer Evening's Concert', Abbotsford House, 23 July 2004

Save Scott's Countryside, a voluntary organisation campaigning to protect the heart of the Scottish Borders from damaging over-development, held a fundraising musical evening in the grounds of Abbotsford House. In addition to a concert consisting of a String Quartet and Clarsach Duo, there was an auction of Quentin Blake's specially commissioned drawing, depicting something of the nature of the Save Scott's Countryside Campaign.

14) VIII Congresso Nacional de Lingüística e Filologia/I Congresso Internacional de Estudos Filológicos e Lingüísticos, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 23-27 August 2004

The 8th Congresso Nacional de Lingüística e Filologia and inaugural Congresso Internacional de Estudos Filológicos e Lingüísticos, organized by the Círculo Fluminense de Estudos Filológicos e Lingüísticos, included two papers of particular Scott interest: 'O herói masculino em Waverley, de Walter Scott' by Elisa Lima Abrantes (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro) and 'Recortes da história: romances scottianos e a preferência pelo pitoresco' by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro). Click here for the conference site and here for résumés of the conference papers.  

15) ESSE-7: 7th Conference of the European Society for the Study of English, Zaragoza, Spain, 8-12 September 2004

The Seventh Conference of ESSE (European Society for the Study of English) included two papers of particular Scott interest. 'National Myths and Literary Icons: Scottish Literature after 1707' by Lyndsay Lunan (Glasgow) considered how 'the culturally constructed iconic figures of Walter Scott and Robert Burns (as representative of the dialectic of establishment, enlightened Scotland versus radical native Scotland) have been co-opted into the monolith of Romantic Scotland'. 'Melancholy Characters in Nineteenth-Century Gothic Fiction' by Santiago Rodríguez Guerrero-Strachan (Valladolid) discussed Scott's 'The Tapestried Chamber' in conjunction with tales by Poe and Le Fanu. An expanded version of Dr Lunan's paper has subsequently appeared in Re-Visioning Scotland: New Readings of the Cultural Canon, ed. Lyndsay Lunan, Kirsty A. Macdonald, and Carla Sassi (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008).

16) 'Romantic Cosmopolitanism', 12th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, University of Colorado, 9-12 September 2004

The 12th Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), held at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, featured six papers of particular Scott interest: Mary M. Burke (Notre Dame), 'The Writings of Walter Scott and the German "Gypsy" Construct', Evan Gottlieb (Oregon State), 'The "Clash of Civilizations" and Its Discontents in Scott’s The Talisman', Julie Kipp (Hope College), 'Walter Scott and the Politics of Radical Reform in Ireland and Scotland', Erik Simpson (Grinnell College), '"A Good One though Rather for the Foreign Market": Mercenary Writing and Fighting in Scott's Quentin Durward', Charles Snodgrass (Xavier), 'Geographical Ambiguity and National Anxiety in Scott's Redgauntlet', and Ted Underwood (Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), 'The Cosmopolitanism of the Living Dead in Banim, Scott, and Sand'. Click here for the conference programme. (An expanded version of Dr Kipp's article subsequently appeared in European Romantic Review, 16 (2005). Dr Burke further developed some of the themes of her paper in a chapter in To the Other Shore: Crosscurrents in Irish and Scottish Studies, ed. Neal Alexander, Shane Murphy and Anne Oakman (Belfast: Queen’s University Press, 2004).)

17) 'O passado no presente: releituras da modernidade', One-Day Conference, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Brazil, 27 September 2004

This one-day conference, organized by the Instituto de Letras of the Universidade Federal Fluminense, included a paper by Ana Lucia de Souza Henriques (Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro), 'Marcas scottianas na Escócia do século XXI', on Scott's influence on 21st-century Scotland. Click here for the conference site.

18) 'Romantic Border Crossings', 11th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, Texas A&M International University, Laredo, Texas, 14-17 October 2004

The Eleventh Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism explored 'a broad range of issues raised by the concept of "borders", the often fuzzy boundary conditions that permeate all areas of Romantic studies'. A panel on Scott consisted of three papers: 'Disseminating Dislocation in James Hogg's Confessions of a Justified Sinner, or, There Is No Place Like Home' by Charles Snodgrass (Xavier), 'The Scottish Border: Generic and Ethnic Demarcations in Sir Walter Scott' by Anne Frey (Loyola University of New Orleans), and 'Imagining the Book: Walter Scott's The Lay of the Last Minstrel and the National Past as Possession' by Matthew Russell (Texas-Austin). Click here for the conference site.

19) 46th Annual Midwest Modern Language Association Convention, St Louis, Missouri, 4-7 November 2004

The forty-sixth Annual Convention of the Midwest Modern Language Association (MMLA) featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Fair Jewess and the Less Interesting Rowena: Race, Femininity, and History in Ivanhoe' by Jennifer Camden (Ohio State). Click here for the conference site.

20) 107th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 5-7 November 2004

The 107th Annual Conference of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA), hosted by Reed College, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: '"The Horrors of My Tale": Trauma, the Historical Imagination, and Sir Walter Scott' by Chad T. May (Oregon). A print version subsequently appeared in Pacific Coast Philology, 40 (2005).

21) 'Myths, Foundation Texts, Imagined Communities', Three-Day Conference, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, 5-7 November 2004

This conference, co-organized by the ACUME European Thematic Network and Charles University, Prague, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Hungarian Romantic Nationalism: The Transformation of Walter Scott’s Highlands into Historical Transylvania' by Emilia Szaffner (Veszprém). In addition to journal articles on Scott, Dr Szaffner is the author of 'The Hungarian Reception of Walter Scott in the Nineteenth Century' in The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe, ed Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006). Click here for the conference programme.

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2003

1) HUSSE 6: 6th Biennial Conference of the Hungarian Society for the Study of English, Debrecen University, 29-31 January 2003

The 6th biennial Conference of HUSSE (Hungarian Society for the Study of English), hosted by Debrecen University, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Walter Scott and the Picturesque' by Emília Szaffner (Veszprém). In addition to journal articles on Scott, Dr Szaffner is the author of 'The Hungarian Reception of Walter Scott in the Nineteenth Century' in The Reception of Sir Walter Scott in Europe, ed Murray Pittock (London: Continuum, 2006).

2) 'Walter Scott et le jeune Balzac', Lecture by Marie-Bénédicte Diethelm, Maison de Balzac, Paris, 15 March 2003

In this talk, hosted by the Société des Amis d'Honoré de Balzac et de la Maison de Balzac, Marie-Bénédicte Diethelm (Paris IV) discussed Scott's influence on the young Balzac. A print version subsequently appeared in Le Courrier balzacien, 90 (2003).

3) 'Crossing Over', ACLA 2003 Annual Meeting, California State University, San Marcos, 4-6 April 2003

The 2003 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), hosted by California State University, San Marcos, included two papers of particular Scott interest: 'Sir Walter Scott and the Politics of Southern National Identity' by Lauren de Beer (Virginia) and 'Translation and the Colonial Sublime in Cooper and Scott' by Andrew Newman (California, Irvine). A print version of Prof. Newman's paper has subsequently appeared in Nineteenth-Century Literature, 59 (2004). Further details from the conference site and programme.

4) Spring Meeting, Charlotte Mary Yonge Fellowship, St Columba's-by-the-Castle, Edinburgh, 5 April 2003

The Spring Meeting of the Charlotte Mary Yonge Fellowship, held in the Church Hall of St Columba's-by-the-Castle, Edinburgh, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Charlotte M Yonge and Sir Walter Scott' by Julia Courtney (Open University). Dr Courtney is co-editor (with Clemence Schultze) of Characters and Scenes: Studies in Charlotte M. Yonge (Abingdon: Beechcroft Books, 2007). Click here for more information.

5) 'Crosscurrents', 2nd Postgraduate Conference in Irish and Scottish Studies, Queens University Belfast, 25-27 April 2003

The Second Annual 'Crosscurrents' conference, organized by the AHRC Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, featured one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Imbrication of Scott’s Gypsy and Highlander Constructs' by Mary M. Burke (Notre Dame). Dr Burke, who now teaches at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, is author of the forthcoming 'Tinkers': Synge and the Cultural History of the Irish Traveller (Oxford University Press, 2009). She subsequently further developed some of the themes of her paper in a chapter in To the Other Shore: Crosscurrents in Irish and Scottish Studies, ed. Neal Alexander, Shane Murphy and Anne Oakman (Belfast: Queen’s University Press, 2004).

6)‘Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson’, One-Day Conference, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 26 April 2003

This one-day conference, hosted by the Smithsonian Institution, was organized by Prof. Stephen Arata (Virginia), who also gave the keynote address. Contact the organizer for more information.

7) 'War and Terrorism', 20th International Social Philosophy Conference, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, 17-19July 2003

The 20th International Social Philosophy Conference, organized by the North American Society for Social Philosophy, and hosted by Northeastern University, featured one paper of Scott interest: 'How to Counter Terrorism Today: The Lessons of Sir Walter Scott’s Novels of Scottish Religious Wars' by Norman A. Fischer (Kent State).

8) Fourth Symbiosis Conference, 'Across the Great Divide', Edinburgh, 18-21 July 2003

The fourth annual conference of Symbiosis, a journal of Anglo-American literary relations, addressed all aspects of literary, theoretical, and material transatlantic cultural exchange between the British Isles and the Americas. Two papers were of particular Scott interest: Penny Fielding (Edinburgh), 'Special Relationships: Espionage in Scott and Cooper' and Colleen Glenney Boggs (Dartmouth College), 'The "American Scott"? James Fenimore Cooper and the Translation of "Language and Manners"'. The conference also marked the launch of the STAR project, an interdisciplinary collaborative venture which aims to further the study of Scotland's links with North America and the Caribbean. Click here for the conference website.

9) 'Scott and Europe', 7th Quadrennial International Scott Conference, University of Konstanz, Germany, 22–26 July 2003

While the thematic focus of this conference, in keeping with the location, was on Scott and Europe, papers considered all aspects of and approaches to Scott's life, works, sources, reputation, and influence. In addition to formal papers, a number of sessions were devoted to roundtable discussions of current teaching, research, and general-interest issues in Scott criticism and Scottish Studies. The keynote speakers were Peter Garside (Cardiff), Christopher Harvie (Tübingen), David Hewitt (Aberdeen), Jane Millgate (Toronto), and Scottish novelist James Robertson. The conference included a memorial session ("Hogg and Scott Scholarship and Criticism: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going?") to celebrate the life and work of the eminent Hogg and Scott scholar Professor Jill Rubenstein, who died unexpectedly on August 21, 2002.

10) 'Romantic Conflict', International BARS Conference, Warwick University, 24-27 July 2003

Among other papers of Scott interest, the biennial conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) featured a lecture by keynote speaker Simon Bainbridge (Keele), 'The "Sir Walter Disease": Scott and the Romantic Reimagining of War'. Click here for the conference site.

11) 'Placing Romanticism: Sites, Borders, Forms', 2003 BARS/NASSR Conference, Fordham University, New York City, 1-5 August 2003

The 11th annual conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR), held in association with the British Association of Romantic Studies (BARS), featured ten papers of particular Scott interest: Scott Campbell (State University of New York, Stony Brook), 'Scars, Not Healing: Godwin's Response to Scott', Maureen McLane (Harvard), 'Tuning the Multi-Media Nation, or, Minstrelsy of the Afro-Scottish Border', Susan Oliver (Cambridge), 'Antiquarianism and Borders in Scott’s Minstrelsy', Andrew Piper (Columbia), '"My tongue is mine ain": Books and Borders in Walter Scott's Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border', Geoffrey Rockwell (McMaster), 'Reflections on Playing McGann and Drucker's IVANHOE Game', Ann Marie Ross (California State), 'Scott's "History of Europe": Revolution and History in Old Mortality', Meg Russett (Southern California), 'Scott, Hogg, and the Border', Charlotte Sussman (Colorado), ‘The Novel in an Age of Mass Migration: Scott's Guy Mannering’, Natasha Tessone (Princeton), 'Homage to the Empty Armour: The Politics of National Heritage in Maria Edgeworth's Harrington and Walter Scott's Ivanhoe', and Michael Wells (British Columbia), 'Romantic Home Theater: Orality and Nationhood in Walter Scott's The Antiquary'. For print versions of some of the papers, see McLane 2004, Oliver 2005, Piper 2009, and Rockwell 2003. Click here for the conference site.

12) 11th International Congress on the Enlightenment and 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, 3-10 August 2003

The 11th International Congress on the Enlightenment, organized by the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ISECS), was held jointly with the 34th Annual meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) at the University of California, Los Angeles. It contained one paper of particular Scott interest: 'The Mercenary, the Savage, and the Civilized War: The Case of Walter Scott' by Andrew Lincoln (London). Dr Lincoln is the author of Walter Scott and Modernity (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007). A print version of his paper subsequently appeared in Scottish Studies Review, 4.2 (2003). See the conference programme for further information.

13) 'Queer Romanticisms', A Two-Day International Conference, Women's Education, Research and Resource Centre, University College Dublin, 15-16 August 2003

This event at the Women's Education, Research, and Resource Centre, University College Dublin, included a paper on 'History, Submission, and Homosexuality in Walter Scott’s Redgauntlet' by Rick Incorvati (Wittenberg). An expanded version of this paper appeared as 'Darsie Latimer's "Little Solidity"; or, The Case for Homosexuality in Scott's Redgauntlet', in Romanticism on the Net, 36/37 (2004-05). Click here for a brief précis.

14) Anglistentag 2003, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany, 15-17 September 2003

The annual meeting of the Deutscher Anglistenverband, held at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, included one paper of particular Scott interest: 'Translating the Historical Novel: The Scott Formula in Nineteenth Century German Literature' by Silvia Mergenthal (Konstanz). A print version of Prof. Mergenthal's paper has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings (Trier: WVT, 2004). Click here for the conference programme.

15) 'Transcultural Identities and Masks', International Conference on Postcolonial and Multicultural Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, 10-12 October 2003

This conference, hosted by the English Department of the University of Bergen, featured a paper which included a discussion of Scott's Waverley: 'Allegories of Ambivalence: Scottish Fiction, Britain and Empire' by Alan Freeman (Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey). A print version of Dr Freeman's paper has subsequently appeared in the conference proceedings (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2007). For further information, see the conference site and programme.

16) 'Freemasonry in Music and Literature', 5th International Conference Organised by Canonbury Masonic Research Centre, Canonbury Academy, London, 1-2 November 2003

This event, organized by Canonbury Masonic Research Centre, included a paper on 'Freemasonry in the Work of Sir Walter Scott' by Robert Cooper, Curator of the Museum and Library of The Grand Lodge of Scotland. For the conference website click here.

17) 'Romanticism and Its Other Discourses', 10th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 13-15 November 2003

The 10th Annual Meeting of the International Conference on Romanticism (ICR) at Marquette University devoted a panel to Scott, featuring the following papers: Rick Incorvati (Wittenberg), 'Sympathy and the Social Order in Scott's Waverley', Bonnie J. Gunzenhauser (Roosevelt), 'Readerly Agency and the Discourse of History in Scott's The Antiquary', Colin Marlaire (Marquette), 'A Voice Within a Voice: Dialogic Discourse in Scott's The Bride of Lammermoor', and Paul Westover (Indiana), 'The Lockean Inheritance in Scott's Redgauntlet: Equivocation "in the Way of Business". Click here for the conference programme. (An expanded version of Prof. Gunzenhauser's paper has subsequently been published in Romanticism: Comparative Discourses, ed. Diane Long Hoeveler and Larry Peer (Ashgate, 2006).)

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